| Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com |

Post new topic Simple Question
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  Simple Question
George Kimery

 

From:
Limestone, TN, USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2021 4:47 pm    
Reply with quote

Do players that are good know they are good as well as players that are bad know they are bad?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

James Sission

 

From:
Sugar Land,Texas USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2021 5:36 pm    
Reply with quote

No
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Bobby D. Jones

 

From:
West Virginia, USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2021 4:41 am    
Reply with quote

Let someone record you, You will know real quick which group you belong in.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

George Kimery

 

From:
Limestone, TN, USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2021 7:02 am     Simple Question
Reply with quote

Bobby, good suggestion.I used to sing when I was 18-20 years old. A few friends were trying to be kind and told me I had a pretty voice. They avoided saying I could sing good. When I recorded my singing for the first time that ended my singing career. That was over 50 years ago and I haven't sung a note since.

I used to record every single band gig. Sometimes when I listed back, I thought I did pretty good. Other times, not so good. I quit and haven't recorded anything in several years. It was affecting my playing and enjoyment. I was too concerned about not making a mistake and/or how something would sound on the recording to be creative and to stretch out and try new things. Band members wanted me to make CD's of the shows for them. I think they may have held back knowing they were being recorded. I now limit my recording to myself at home for trainng purposes.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Paul King

 

From:
Gainesville, Texas, USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2021 7:30 am    
Reply with quote

My first steel guitar record was "Hal Rugg Steels The Hits Of Loretta Lynn". I had a friend tell me if you ever think you are getting good just pull this record out and listen to it again.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Richard Lotspeich

 

From:
North Georgia
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2021 5:22 pm     Descent
Reply with quote

My desire ,after finishing ANY gig Ive done---is for the people that were there to say "he sounded good,knew when not to play,and was a help to the GROUP" Most groups in this area dont really have a need or desire for a steel player anymore. I did a recording (first) in 19 with a friend that needed steel. Hes a great musician and I was a touch on edge. I was amazed at how much I sucked through headphones. Many variables there. It was awful at first but got some better with time. But atleast I knew it,,,lol.
_________________
Dick Lotspeich
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Marco Schouten


From:
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 6:49 am    
Reply with quote

Paul King wrote:
My first steel guitar record was "Hal Rugg Steels The Hits Of Loretta Lynn". I had a friend tell me if you ever think you are getting good just pull this record out and listen to it again.


I play Greensleeves everyday,sometimes I have the illusion that I'm playing it pretty well.....but then I listen to Emmons version on the Black Album and I'm with both feet on the floor again.
_________________
----------------------------------
Marco Schouten
JCH SD-10, Quilter Steelaire, Evans SE200, Sho-Bud Volume Pedal, Sho-Bud bar, 7/8th zirc bar, 15/16th zirc bar, Emmons bar, John Pearse bar
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 7:44 am    
Reply with quote

I'm not as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was. Very Happy
Erv
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Bill L. Wilson

 

From:
Oklahoma, USA
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 9:28 am     I Think it’s Called Confidence.
Reply with quote

The people that are exceptionally talented musicians know they can produce in any situation. I always admire the things Paul and my favorite piano player of all time, Hargus “Pig” Robbins come up with. Experience and a great ear are the two things most of us don’t have.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Chris Brooks

 

From:
Providence, Rhode Island
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 9:43 am    
Reply with quote

Erv !!!
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Jim Cooley


From:
The 'Ville, Texas, USA
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 9:59 am    
Reply with quote

At the risk of being a little off topic, I wonder if the pros do this. I recently started recording songs or parts of songs on my phone. I initially used the recordings to compare amp settings and speakers. However, I soon started noticing a note I didn't realize was a little flat or sharp, or a phrase that doesn't sound as good as I thought it sounded when I played it. I even occasionally hear something that sounds better than I expect, and that helps too. Listening to the recordings also sometimes gives me ideas for alternate voicings and phrasings.

Last edited by Jim Cooley on 23 Jan 2021 12:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Jerry Overstreet


From:
Louisville Ky
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 11:14 am    
Reply with quote

It depends what is the definition of good.

I think professional players know they are capable and can deliver what's needed in any situation. I don't believe they're too concerned with how "good" they are.

The more you know about music in general, the more comfortable you will be in an unfamiliar environment.

That is what I've always strived for. To educate myself musically to the point I feel comfortable playing in all types of situations. Not that I haven't fallen short many times, but I'm definitely painfully aware of it.

I try not to pass judgement, but I have heard players struggle that have been playing for a long time and I do wonder if they realize just how lacking they are.

Concerning recording, I never like to hear micelf. I have only a few times that I was ever satisfied hearing myself in playback. I guess that should tell me something about the second part of your question.
View user's profile Send private message

Curt Trisko


From:
St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 1:10 pm    
Reply with quote

Jerry Overstreet wrote:
I think professional players know they are capable and can deliver what's needed in any situation. I don't believe they're too concerned with how "good" they are.


My thoughts on reading this thread go in a similar direction. The pros can deliver across the board. For the rest of us, it may be more a matter of knowing what you do well and what you just don't have. Shining with what you do well and taking a measured approach with what you don't are virtues.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Paul Sutherland

 

From:
Placerville, California
Post  Posted 23 Jan 2021 2:49 pm    
Reply with quote

"Know they are good" sounds arrogant, but "confident in their abilities" is what you should expect from a professional.

Sometimes I'm confident, and sometimes I'm in over my head on a particular song.

If I play another 50 years maybe I'll always be confident.
_________________
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Damir Besic


From:
Nashville,TN.
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 6:46 am    
Reply with quote

I know some great players working day jobs to survive, and I know some less than average players who make bunch of money just playing music ... that was before this covid bs tho
_________________
www.steelguitarsonline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website

Rick Barnhart


From:
Arizona, USA
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 9:15 am     Re: Simple Question
Reply with quote

George Kimery wrote:
Do players that are good know they are good as well as players that are bad know they are bad?


Simple answer...yes!
_________________
Clinesmith consoles D-8/6 5 pedal, D-8 3 pedal & A25 Frypan, Pettingill Teardrop, & P8 Deluxe.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Ken Boi


From:
Arizona, USA
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 11:50 am     Re: Simple Question
Reply with quote

George Kimery wrote:
Bobby, good suggestion.I used to sing when I was 18-20 years old. A few friends were trying to be kind and told me I had a pretty voice. They avoided saying I could sing good. When I recorded my singing for the first time that ended my singing career. That was over 50 years ago and I haven't sung a note since..

On the other hand, don’t sell yourself too short. There is a lot of talk that John Lennon (Beatles) did not like his singing voice. Maybe he didn’t have the greatest singing voice in a traditional sense, but taken in context of his great songs and recordings he can be considered as having a very good singing voice. Smile
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Bruce Bouton

 

From:
Nash. Tn USA
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 2:02 pm    
Reply with quote

I'm always checking myself. I just saw a video I did where I was able to see my left hand. Man, I've developed some bad technique. Now I'm acutely aware of it and I think it's helping me get better. It takes a lot of years to get comfortable on an instrument. I'm amazed at how many great players I know that don't realize how good they are.

Serious players think are never good enough and are constantly striving to improve their playing.
_________________
www.brucebouton.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website

Justin Emmert

 

From:
Martinsville, VA
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 2:27 pm    
Reply with quote

All you have to do is record yourself, preferably to a high quality in tune track. That’s all you need to humble yourself.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Bruce Bouton

 

From:
Nash. Tn USA
Post  Posted 25 Jan 2021 4:48 pm    
Reply with quote

Bruce Bouton wrote:
I'm always checking myself. I just saw a video I did where I was able to see my left hand. Man, I've developed some bad technique. Now I'm acutely aware of it and I think it's helping me get better. It takes a lot of years to get comfortable on an instrument. I'm amazed at how many great players I know that don't realize how good they are.

Serious players are constantly striving to improve their playing.

_________________
www.brucebouton.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website

James Sission

 

From:
Sugar Land,Texas USA
Post  Posted 26 Jan 2021 6:46 am    
Reply with quote

Bruce Bouton wrote:
Serious players think are never good enough and are constantly striving to improve their playing.


That statement is strongly supported in the the dialog between Tommy White and Paul Franklin on Paul's interview video.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 26 Jan 2021 10:11 am    
Reply with quote

James Sission wrote:
Bruce Bouton wrote:
Serious players think are never good enough and are constantly striving to improve their playing.


That statement is strongly supported in the the dialog between Tommy White and Paul Franklin on Paul's interview video.

So, isn’t it good enough for all of us? That statement works for me, even though I am not a great recording artist and never will be. It’s just silly for me to compare my playing to Hal Rugg or Buddy Emmons. I guess that’s the simple answer to the OP question.

I measure my progress by the way it feels when I play. I don’t have to record my every performance to know that some of them were good for my level and some of them sucked. Enough “fans” have done crappy recordings of my band on their phones and posted the horrifying result on social media the next day for me to realize that making them happy is not always about me being my musical best. That doesn’t stop me from wanting to grow with the instrument and really working at it, whether my friends notice or not. Why? Because it’s more fun to play when you get better at it.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Rick Campbell


From:
Sneedville, TN, USA
Post  Posted 26 Jan 2021 6:30 pm    
Reply with quote

I've never done anything music wise that I was totally satisfied with.

RC
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Kevin Fix

 

From:
Michigan, USA
Post  Posted 26 Jan 2021 8:16 pm    
Reply with quote

"SAME AS ERV" I recorded myself with groups I was with over the years. Was great medicine for my hands, knees and feet. It taught me what not to do and what to do better.
Smile Smile Smile Smile
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

George Kimery

 

From:
Limestone, TN, USA
Post  Posted 27 Jan 2021 7:32 am     Simple question
Reply with quote

Rick, I feel the same way. I have played at a few steel shows and only one did I think I played as well as I can. I felt good about that, but still wasn't totally satisfied. If I ever get to the point I'm totally satisfied, that will mean I've eat the carrot that is always dangling in front of my face driving me on. I fear I would lose interest because the challenge would be gone. As I have learned my way around my guitar a lot better, that has brought on a new problem. Now I can play things multiple ways and now I have to decide which way sounds the best. One way may sound best here at home, but I have concerns that another way may cut though the mix and sound better with the band. I'm a total amateur and steel guitar is simply a 50 year hobby. I should just play the best I can and enjoy it, which I do, and be satisfied. I think I take it way too seriously.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail


All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  
Please review our Forum Rules and Policies
Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction, and steel guitar accessories
www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 S. Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Click Here to Send a Donation

Email SteelGuitarForum@gmail.com for technical support.


BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron