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Post new topic Volume Pedal Heel Lift?
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Author Topic:  Volume Pedal Heel Lift?
Matthew Walton


From:
Fort Worth, Texas
Post  Posted 5 Jul 2020 10:33 am    
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Hi all, at the risk of starting another footwear thread, I had an idea and thought I'd float it here to see if I'm solving the wrong problem.

For reference I currently use a Goodrich L 120.

Do any of y'all use some sort of "heel lift" on your volume pedal, at least while practicing? I generally perform in cowboy boots, but usually practice barefoot. The biggest issue I run into with this (other than reaching the vertical knee lever) is that the angle of the volume pedal lower than say 40% tends to be uncomfortable, and in general I feel like I'm not operating the volume pedal as well as I could. So I had the thought of putting maybe a wedge or something below the heel of the volume pedal to simulate the lift provided by cowboy boots.

Do any of y'all run into this issue, or is this a sign that I need to do some more stretching (probably true regardless)?

I'm kind of wondering if I should instead just spread my practice time between boots, tennis shoes, and barefoot. The thought of being in a situation of "I'd sure love to play your steel, but I'm not wearing boots and I don't have my special wedge" is not a pleasant one. Or heck, maybe I'm playing a gig where shorts are acceptable, and shorts with cowboy boots does not match my typical "hippie nerd cop" look. Laughing

Matt
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David Gertschen

 

From:
Phoenix, Arizona
Post  Posted 5 Jul 2020 2:08 pm    
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Hi Matthew, I had this same problem. I solved it by taking a piece of 3/4" square magnetic keyway stock, about 3" long and sticking that under the back bottom of my volume pedal. That makes the angle feel much more comfortable for my ankle. I never could get used to playing in cowboy boots.
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Dave Meis


From:
Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA
Post  Posted 5 Jul 2020 4:11 pm    
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I use a piece of wood under the heel of my VP if I'm not wearing boots.. same as others, my ankle doesn't want to do that! I don't have the problem with my old Sho Bud VP, and I'm wondering if a standard 120 would work?
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Jack Stoner


From:
New Port Richey Florida
Post  Posted 6 Jul 2020 4:32 am    
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Hilton sells (or at least used to) adjustable feet for the rear to raise the rear of the pedal. I bought a set but never found a need for them in my case.
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Pete Burak

 

From:
Portland, OR USA
Post  Posted 6 Jul 2020 5:56 am    
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I use a square piece of foam cut to fit the heel end of my volume pedal.
I keep it in my Steel Seat. It has some double sided tape on one side.
Works great for practice or gigging in certain shoes, sandles, slippers, bare feet, etc. Typically not needed for Cowboy Boots.
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John Goux

 

From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 7 Jul 2020 8:50 pm    
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I just realized something from reading this thread. I’m good with a volume pedal on electric guitar, but on pedal steel I have to remind myself to stay in the back 1/3 of the pedal. It is not comfortable to have my ankle flexed upward.. I’ve told myself, if the pedal could just be a few inches further forward...but it can’t due to the pedal bar.

I just placed a couple of coasters under the back of the volume pedal, tilting it slightly toward the front. Seems to solve the issue. Easier to stay in the back of the pedal.
Now there is one more thing to forget packing up!

John
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Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2020 12:08 am    
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It all depends on personal ankle geometry, so it's another whatever-works-for-you.
In our game of football (soccer) there are players who can naturally kick the ball hard and low, which is useful in attack, and those who tend to fire upwards, which is great for clearing the ball long distances from defence, especially if they can reliably hit 45 degrees.


On pedal steel I'm happy with volume pedals as supplied, although I seem to like the floor pedals higher than average: both the steels I bought had the pedals set what seemed very close to the floor and I had to cut extra threads on some of the pedal rods to get them comfortable. Had I played, I guess I would have been a defender! Smile
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Matthew Walton


From:
Fort Worth, Texas
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2020 6:45 am    
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I did notice the other day that it's not as bad if I back away from the steel, and I still seemed able to hit the knee levers. Maybe sitting that close was a habit I picked up from playing D-10? I still had the issue then, but at least I had the excuse of having to reach across the C6 neck to reach the E9 neck!
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If something I wrote can be interpreted two ways, and one of the ways makes you sad or angry, I meant the other one.

1981 MSA “The Universal” 9/5 | 2009 MSA S-12 SuperSlide | 1978 MSA D-10 8/5 | Peavey Nashville 112 |Fender Twin Reverb Reissue | ZT Lunchbox
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Robert Rogers

 

From:
Manchester,TN
Post  Posted 10 Jul 2020 7:19 pm    
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Matthew the emmons, derby volume pedals have a screw on the pedal to lift rear of the pedal up or down and I absolutely love that feature.


Last edited by Robert Rogers on 10 Jul 2020 8:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Larry Bressington


From:
The beautiful sunsets of Nebraska
Post  Posted 10 Jul 2020 7:27 pm    
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Adjustable feet is the way to go if possible, I actually JB Welded a piece of wood onto mine a few years back after experimenting incrementally where I wanted to be, it’s still holding up well in my road case and eased my ankle tremendously. I play a S10 and they can be a bit narrow footprint compared to a D body.

I also have a home set up which is separate from my road set up, so I don’t have to mix n match practice to gigs etc.
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David Graves


From:
Indiana, USA
Post  Posted 10 Jul 2020 8:28 pm    
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John Goux, I was in a head on collision with a semi in 98’ and it took my right leg off at the knee. I only have about 2 inches of movement around the ankle area and a volume pedal was to far back for me to use. I built a small “bridge” over my pedal bar and it moves the volume pedal forward and up. I’m able to use all of my knee levers, verticals and my volume pedal fairly easy. You might try this. Other than weird looks and questions it works great for me.

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