| Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com |
Oct 23: Comcast.net is rejecting forum emails.
We are working to resolve this.

Post new topic New tuning?
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  New tuning?
Russell Adkins

 

From:
Louisiana, USA
Post  Posted 12 May 2020 8:56 pm    
Reply with quote

Was thinking about a dadgad which is an open g tuning anyways how would that work out with an 8 string pedal steel ? anybody got an ideas on the matter? lets say two peds and two knees , anybody? What kind of copedent would work on that ?

Last edited by Russell Adkins on 12 May 2020 8:59 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Russell Adkins

 

From:
Louisiana, USA
Post  Posted 12 May 2020 8:58 pm    
Reply with quote

That tuning on a reg 6 string guitar would be from bottom to top D A d g a d in case you didn't know . Are chords possible with this tuning ? scales would be I know that majors and minors ? , any comments are welcome
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Paul Sutherland

 

From:
Placerville, California
Post  Posted 12 May 2020 10:02 pm    
Reply with quote

I don't see how this is an open G tuning. If G is considered the tonic, then the A notes are the second/ninth intervals, and the D notes are fifth intervals. You have a boat load of fifth intervals, no third intervals, and a couple second/ninths. That's pretty odd looking.

If you meant to say this is an open D tuning then it makes somewhat more sense because you have a third (G) and a couple fifths (A).

CORRECTION!! What I just said is wrong. The G note would be the fourth interval to D, not the third. So you still can't play a full 3 note major chord.

Do you want to play swing/jazzy music, or Nashville E9 sounding music? Or perhaps something else, i.e., blues?
_________________
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing.


Last edited by Paul Sutherland on 13 May 2020 8:05 am; edited 2 times in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Russell Adkins

 

From:
Louisiana, USA
Post  Posted 12 May 2020 11:03 pm    
Reply with quote

Thank you Paul for the correction A D it is . Im just looking for something different rather than the e9 or c6 and I thought dadgad might be a possibility since it is popular on a reg 6 string guitar and it sounds good so given that I was thinking about a 8 string pedal steel with no particular style of music in mind . Im just experimenting here.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Franklin

 

Post  Posted 13 May 2020 3:06 am    
Reply with quote

Hi Russell

To play chords you need access to an octave and 1/2 of intervals.

Both the C6th and E9th and all of the known universal tunings are there.

A dobro is your example...The Dobro can play a lot of music but without diatonic notes it can not play a lot of chords.

Towards playing chords when strings are tuned to wider intervals this prompts the need for more pedals.

Visually look at the guitar tuned to DADGAD and view playing a bar chord position at fret 3. Guitarists have the ability to keep all 5 strings the same while exploring on a single string 4 frets of chromatic note options. We would need 4 pedals to accomplish the same. So within this formula 4 pedals X 6 strings = 24 pedals to reach the same chordal options... To do the same on a steel with the same tuning you would need 4 pedals per string. Adding diatonic notes to any tuning negates a few pedal needs.

Guitarists are able to access all the strings with the 4 fret option per string which makes the DADGAD chords sound cool. Gary Adams came up with a very sensible tuning built off of what guitarists can access.
View user's profile Send private message


All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  
Please review our Forum Rules and Policies
Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction, and steel guitar accessories
www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 S. Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Click Here to Send a Donation

Email SteelGuitarForum@gmail.com for technical support.


BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron