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Post new topic To slant or not to slant, that is the question...
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Author Topic:  To slant or not to slant, that is the question...
Francisco Castillo


From:
Easter Island, Chile
Post  Posted 7 Apr 2019 7:06 pm    
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Hi all.

i have a question,

if two notes can be played in straight or slant position...


What makes you chose either one?

always straight?
glissando above all?
other thoughts that may come in to play at the moment of choice??

thanks a lot
iorana, maururu
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b0b


From:
Cloverdale, CA
Post  Posted 7 Apr 2019 7:22 pm    
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Ease of play under pressure is one consideration, if you're learning a song to perform it. Otherwise, the timbre should be the primary concern. How does the position sound against the notes before and after it?

The decision to gliss or not is one of musical phrasing. The timbre is always correct when you're sliding from one position to another, but blocking might improve the lyrical quality of the line.
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Dom Franco


From:
Beaverton, OR, 97007
Post  Posted 7 Apr 2019 8:30 pm    
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To my ear, most players who (try to) slant often sound a bit out of tune Kinda like a Diesel Train horn...

So if I can play a chord or interval with a strait bar I do. but sometimes it requires a jump of several frets, and if that breaks up the flow so bad that I would rather slant, then I will slant. Some songs just beg for a slant allowing a note to sustain while the harmony changes, then I must slant. Because with out pedals that's the only way to get that sound.
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David M Brown


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 8 Apr 2019 5:48 am    
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For me it's an issue of phrasing.

Does the passage need to be very legato? Then I'll choose a slant to keep the line connected. If it musically works well with more detached articulation I'll use a straight bar option for the same pitches.
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Mike Neer


From:
NJ
Post  Posted 8 Apr 2019 8:27 am    
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Depends on what comes before, what comes next. Also, the timbre I’m looking for (position on the neck affects timbre greatly). It’s best to learn to have both available just to break up the monotony and give options.
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Nic Neufeld


From:
Kansas City, Missouri
Post  Posted 9 Apr 2019 3:48 pm    
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I used to hate slants and avoid them whenever I could (block and shift on the neck). But my teacher kept throwing them at me and I got a bit better at them ("the fault, dear Brutus, was not in slants, but in myself"). In the Hawaiian style particularly there's such a high premium on connected notes that slants are so important for a connected melody with harmony line. But no hard and fast rules, sometimes jumping around or shifting strings works better musically, in Hawaiian just as in any other style.

Also, there's plenty of stuff you can't do any other way without pedals...split bar diminished chords, etc.

Subconsciously I think I'm doing a kind of priority ranking when I'm picking where to go with a melody line:
1. Nearby/same strings straight bar
2. Nearby/same strings slant
3. Nearby/same strings reverse slant (may frequently trade positions with #4...these aren't my favorite)
4. Jump strings or jump a bunch of frets, straight bar
...
...
...
37. Jump a bunch of frets for a slant...I've done something wrong and should reevaluate my life choices (OK, I guess there's always an exception...jumping up for a split bar on Paradise Isle, for example)

At least for slow, legato numbers where you need that nahenahe sound.
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James Kerr


From:
Scotland, UK
Post  Posted 12 Apr 2019 12:04 pm    
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If you are playing Live then you have to make those choices, but if you are recording you can choose to do as I do here, double tracking to give you the Harmony's you need.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6f8txnTMp8g

James Kerr.
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Bill McCloskey


Post  Posted 12 Apr 2019 12:10 pm    
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Slants are completely unnecessary in my tuning, I've yet to find something I couldn't play straight bar. Of course you can use them for effect, but I never do. I'm actually trying to make the steel sound less like a stereotypical steel guitar.
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Joe Elk


From:
Ohio, USA
Post  Posted 12 Apr 2019 12:38 pm    
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It may be, but that's what got me hooked!!!!! Oh I'm Old I did not have to go to
bed until I had heard Lulu Belle and Scoty sing on Saturday.
Joe Elk Central Ohio
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Steve Lipsey


From:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Post  Posted 12 Apr 2019 3:30 pm    
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Bill - You didn't think to mention how many strings you have to have (and that you do have) to make slants a moot point...
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Bill McCloskey


Post  Posted 12 Apr 2019 3:53 pm    
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Smile yeah, Steve. 12 Strings comes in handy
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Steve Marinak


From:
Ocean Ridge, Florida, USA
Post  Posted 13 Apr 2019 4:16 am    
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I'm no expert on slants, but at the stage where I'm starting to use them.

Some slant notes just seem more appropriate than their same straight choice in tonality. It's almost like the straight notes sound too wholesome/straight ahead/boring. (In some cases I should add).

Plus if I have to jump far away to get that straight set of notes, the flow doesn't sound continuous.
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Mike Christensen


From:
Cook Minnesota
Post  Posted 16 Apr 2019 6:33 pm     slants
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Why would you not want to learn and use slants? Can be used for smooth flow and for a different voicing option. You are missing out on quite a bit by denying yourself these few moves in my opinion especially on 6 strings.
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