| Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com |

Post new topic Why do all the hipsters play Williams?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  Why do all the hipsters play Williams?
Tim Sheinman


From:
Brighton, UK
Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 4:53 am    
Reply with quote

There's no doubt to me that typical Williams look a bit more like modern instruments (or even furniture) than more 'nashville' style instruments, e.g. Mica, deep sunburst, extavagant lettering etc.

They generally have clean lines of Williams guitars and a cool, minimal aesthetic which fits in well with the rock crowd.

When I was getting my ext. E9 made, I said to Bill I wanted it to look like a piece of Scandinavian furniture.


View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Joel Jackson


From:
North Carolina, USA
Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 6:40 am    
Reply with quote

Maybe you should've shopped for a steel at IKEA. Might've saved you some money.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 6:52 am    
Reply with quote

I think one of the reasons that Williams guitars appeal to a lot of players is because Bill offers "lacquered" guitars at no additional cost.
He puts on a super hard finish that's impervious to almost anything. Very Happy
Erv
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 7:02 am    
Reply with quote

The finish is superb. It's a piece of furniture in its own right.
_________________
Homebuilt keyless U12 7x5, Excel keyless U12 8x8, Williams keyless U12 7x8, Telonics rack and 15" cabs
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Asa Brosius


Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 7:46 am    
Reply with quote

Leisz and Eric Heywood have played Williams' - Heywood found one at garage sale, and Leisz mentioned somewhere he finds they sit better in a pop mix- these two play on a lot of popular records and tour with artists that aren't specifically country- doesn't it make sense that people into that style/sound would seek those guitars? Did you also notice Lloyd Green fans favor LDG's?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
J R Rose


From:
Keota, Oklahoma, USA
Post  Posted 20 Jan 2019 7:38 pm    
Reply with quote

Hey Tim, Well it looks nice, Plain and simple like Danish Modern so I guess you got what you wanted and that's the way it should be, it was your money. I hope you have many years of great picking on it no matter what style of music you are playing. I have all ways stated that the Pedal Steel Guitar can fit in with any style of music, the picker just has to open his mind to new outlets. And Williams is a First Class Steel, just ask Wally Murphy. He as played them for years and plays them well. Good Luck, J.R.
_________________
Black Rains SD-10, Peavey LTD 400 with 15" Telonics, Sho-Bud Seat, Goodrich Pedal, Sho-Bud Bar, Picks, Cords.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Richard Sinkler


From:
aka: Rusty Strings -- Oakdale, California
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 7:09 am     Re: Williams
Reply with quote

Jerry Horch wrote:
They look great.who wants to play something ugly.


There are several other brands that look equally as good. I had a Williams 600 for a couple of years. Great guitar.
_________________
CLICK HERE to visit my website with Mickey Adams videos.

Mullen SD12 3p/4k, Carter D10 9p/9k, Peavey Nashville 400 with a BW1502-4, Hilton VP, Tech 21 Roto Choir, Wampler Euphoria, EH Mel9, Zoom MS50G
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Richard Sinkler


From:
aka: Rusty Strings -- Oakdale, California
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 7:15 am    
Reply with quote

Erv Niehaus wrote:
I think one of the reasons that Williams guitars appeal to a lot of players is because Bill offers "lacquered" guitars at no additional cost.
He puts on a super hard finish that's impervious to almost anything. Very Happy
Erv


That convinced me to buy the one I had.
_________________
CLICK HERE to visit my website with Mickey Adams videos.

Mullen SD12 3p/4k, Carter D10 9p/9k, Peavey Nashville 400 with a BW1502-4, Hilton VP, Tech 21 Roto Choir, Wampler Euphoria, EH Mel9, Zoom MS50G
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Herb Steiner


From:
Spicewood TX 78669
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 8:47 am    
Reply with quote

The Webster definition of "hipster": a person who is unusually aware of and interested in new and unconventional patterns (as in jazz or fashion)

Being in my 70s and from Hollywood CA, I remember hipsters from the 50's and early 60's as the cognoscenti, into literature like Ginsburg and Kerouac, predominantly cool jazz fans, folkies who were into Leadbelly before the Kingston Trio hit, and citybillies who were into bluegrass before the Beverly Hillbillies and Bonnie and Clyde.

Though I had long hair and all that, I never considered myself a hippie, and always replied "no, I'm a hipster" when identified as the former; i.e. I never wore a peace symbol necklace over my Nehru jacket or burned sandalwood incense (well, maybe once Wink ) and I went to precious few "love-in" concerts. I never considered "hipster" to be a putdown or have a negative conotation, except by the "squares" of course.

Cultural items chosen by hipsters immediately became "hip" to own or adopt, always before the general public became aware of and soon after became commercialized, homogenized, and diluted. Or, sometimes when things become rediscovered by hipsters, examples in the steel world being Franklin guitars, Bigsbys or wraparound Emmonses when they could be had for under $2000.

The definitive story is about the square who told Ray Charles that he was "hep" to what Ray was doing, and Ray's reply was "I'm hip you're hep." Laughing
_________________
Herb's Steel Guitar Pages
Texas Steel Guitar Association
Allison String Instruments
My rig: Infinity and Telonics.

Son, we live in a world with walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with steel guitars. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinberg?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Pete Burak


From:
Portland, OR USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 9:42 am    
Reply with quote

I hope to own a Williams someday.
Fwiw, I am pretty sure that if you groom your facial hair into what is commonly referred to as a "Soul Patch"...
You might be a Hipster Smile


Last edited by Pete Burak on 21 Jan 2019 9:54 am; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 9:53 am    
Reply with quote

Thank you, Herb - educational as always.

I'm not over-interested in novelty, so I'm probably safe. That includes facial hair.
_________________
Homebuilt keyless U12 7x5, Excel keyless U12 8x8, Williams keyless U12 7x8, Telonics rack and 15" cabs
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Mitch Drumm


From:
Frostbite Falls, hard by Veronica Lake
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 10:42 am    
Reply with quote

Herb Steiner wrote:
.............I remember hipsters from the 50's and early 60's as the cognoscenti, into literature like Ginsburg and Kerouac, predominantly cool jazz fans...........


Here's an early version from 1947 and the current version.

Trajectory up or trajectory down in 70 years?

I'm going to have to re-examine concepts such as self-awareness and irony.





View user's profile Send private message
Jerry Overstreet


From:
Louisville Ky
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 10:46 am    
Reply with quote

Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
View user's profile Send private message
Herb Steiner


From:
Spicewood TX 78669
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 10:50 am    
Reply with quote

I vote down, decidedly. Laughing
_________________
Herb's Steel Guitar Pages
Texas Steel Guitar Association
Allison String Instruments
My rig: Infinity and Telonics.

Son, we live in a world with walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with steel guitars. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinberg?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Bill Ladd


From:
Wilmington, NC, USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 11:44 am    
Reply with quote

Mitch Drumm wrote:
Here's an early version from 1947....


Thread drift - I’ve heard it said Harry “The Hipster” Gibson was the one who made up the word. So it might be fair to say “the original version from 1947.”

https://youtu.be/VlK0y8TlzUE


Last edited by Bill Ladd on 21 Jan 2019 4:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim Cooley


From:
The 'Ville, Texas, USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 4:20 pm    
Reply with quote

Does this mean Sir Mix-A-Lot is not a hipster?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Stephen Rethmeier


From:
Yorba Linda, California, USA
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 4:30 pm    
Reply with quote

Tucker Jackson wrote:

And I think it's a similar thing with other players being influenced by Greg Liesz (being maybe the most-recorded session player in the non-country genres).


Pretty much this.

I was introduced to Greg and pedal steel at a recording session I was invited to about 5 years ago. The producer was doing a record for my son-in-law and invited me to come down and watch/hear Greg play on 4-5 songs. They had him set up next to the board while they put his amp in a sound booth. As a result, I got to sit about 3 feet from him as he played. I'd never watched anyone play a pedal steel that close before and he made it look so effortless, I thought, "how hard can it be?" I signed up for lessons that week with John McClung. He helped me buy a used Carter Pro and I quickly learned how hard it can be...

Anyway, after a few years, I decided I wanted a 12-string extended and knew Greg played a Williams. I called Bill to discuss what it took to acquire one and he mentioned Eric Heywood, whom I also admire, also played one. Since we don't have the opportunity to play a bunch of different steels before we buy, I figured if it was good enough for them, it'd probably be a very low risk purchase. After owning for about 18 months still very happy with it. But if I could afford it, I would have a few other brands as well.
_________________
Williams S12 Ext. E9 keyless, Williams S12 Ext. E9 keyed, Telonics TCA 500C, Quilter Steelaire, Magic Fender clone, 1937 Model 59 Rick 6, 1940 Epiphone 7-string Zephyr, Oahu 6, 8+/- regular guitars, Kawai baby grand, two cats...
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tom Mortensen


From:
Nashville TN
Post  Posted 21 Jan 2019 6:39 pm    
Reply with quote

Are all of the mentioned hipsters, playing wooden necks?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 1:12 am    
Reply with quote

Too traditional, surely?
_________________
Homebuilt keyless U12 7x5, Excel keyless U12 8x8, Williams keyless U12 7x8, Telonics rack and 15" cabs
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 7:51 am    
Reply with quote

Don't call me Shirley! Whoa!
Erv
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Pete Burak


From:
Portland, OR USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 8:56 am    
Reply with quote

Looks like wood necks neck are part of the equation:

Eric Heywood on a Williams:

Barry Sless on a Williams:
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Hugo Knef


From:
Vallejo , California
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 12:26 pm    
Reply with quote

Hmmm. I have 2 Williams s10’s and I just grew my beard..........
_________________
Williams S10 moyo mini yamaha g100-12.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 8:04 pm    
Reply with quote

Bill Ladd wrote:
I’ve heard it said Harry “The Hipster” Gibson was the one who made up the word. So it might be fair to say “the original version from 1947.


I dunno, I always thought that "hep" (as in "hepcat") came before "hip" (as in "hipster"). A little searching tells that both terms came about in the early 1900's, and that the Oxford dictionary featured them in the 1930's.

https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/12/06/249275784/dont-you-dare-call-me-a-hipster-i-sir-am-a-hep-cat


Last edited by Donny Hinson on 24 Jan 2019 7:17 am; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Aaron Shively


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 9:35 pm    
Reply with quote

I think this post was directed at me specifically! My two hugest influences are heywood and leisz. When I saw they both played williams, I made a vow to save up and buy one. I’m not exactly hipster, but i am a little scruffy, love my third wave coffee shops, and gravitate to non-strictly-country pedal steel sounds.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jeff Mead


From:
London, England
Post  Posted 22 Jan 2019 11:19 pm    
Reply with quote

Olli Haavisto wrote:
BJ Cole still plays his Kline actively as well as his Williams.


Yes, also according to his website, he uses the Kline most often live and in the studio and he bought the Williams while on tour as a backup guitar. It is only the Kline that has a MIDI pickup fitted which he would probably use more on his progressibe/alternative stuff.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  
Please review our Forum Rules and Policies
Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction, and steel guitar accessories
www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 S. Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Support This Forum



BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron