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Post new topic Merry Christmas from the Beavers’ Family
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Author Topic:  Merry Christmas from the Beavers’ Family
Randy Beavers


From:
Lebanon,TN 37090
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 8:20 am    
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Hope everyone has a great Holiday season!
https://youtu.be/ZpRf9aob02c
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john buffington


From:
Owasso OK - USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 8:35 am    
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Merry Christmas to you also, great playing.
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Fred Justice


From:
Mesa, Arizona
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 8:50 am    
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I am totally blessed by the Lord.
Merry Christmas to you and Judy as well Randy.
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Jerry Overstreet


From:
Louisville Ky
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 9:09 am    
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Just beautiful Randy. Great playing. Wonderful sound. Even made the Grinch happy.

Merry Christmas to you and your family.
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Jeff Garden


From:
Center Sandwich, New Hampshire, USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 9:40 am    
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Merry Christmas to you and your family, Randy...and thanks for the music! Smile
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Gary Peaslee


From:
Granbury, TX USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 1:12 pm    
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Your talent is a blessing to all especially at Christmas time. Thank you for sharing. Wishing you and your family a wonderful holiday and many blessings in 2019.
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Craig Stock


From:
Westfield, NJ USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 2:43 pm    
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Merry Christmas Randy, Thanks for the new video, you are one of the best, I enjoy all your cd's that I have purchased when you played at the PSGA shows a few years back. Looking forward to anything new you put out.

Hope you have a great Christmas and New Year!
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Regards, Craig

I cried because I had no shoes, then I met a man who had no feet.
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Larry Dering


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 4:56 pm    
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And Merry Christmas to you and yours. Have a blessed Holiday.
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Larry Dering


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 5:16 pm    
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And Merry Christmas to you and yours. Have a blessed Holiday.
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Kevin Fix


From:
Michigan, USA
Post  Posted 24 Dec 2018 8:46 pm    
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Have a Blessed One there Randy!!!! Loved it!!!! Smile Smile Smile Smile
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Rex Blevins


From:
Tulsa, Oklahoma USA
Post  Posted 25 Dec 2018 6:41 am    
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Great playing Randy..
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Carl Williams


From:
Oklahoma
Post  Posted 25 Dec 2018 7:58 am     Merry Christmas!
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Thanks for your gift of music Randy...a beautiful Christmas Day here in Oklahoma...🎄 Carl
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Floyd Lowery


From:
Deland, Florida, USA
Post  Posted 25 Dec 2018 8:12 am    
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Merry Christmas to you and your family. Thank you for the great Christmas music. You always play so nice and smooth.
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Peavy Nashville 400 & Session 500
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Paul Pearson


From:
Alabama, USA
Post  Posted 25 Dec 2018 5:12 pm     Randy Beavers
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Merry Christmas to you and your family supper supper great playing as always love it
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Dan Rollans


From:
Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
Post  Posted 25 Dec 2018 6:56 pm     Merry Christmas
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Awesome!!!!! I became an Randy Beavers fan in 1976 at the ISGC in St. Louis.
I was 14 years old. I heard this great sound coming from behind a closed door and had to check it out. There I found Bruce Zumsteg grinning from ear to ear watching Randy bring to life a brand new blue ZumSteel. I was astonished. I’m still amazed with his playing today even more.
Merry Christmas Randy and Family from myself and Steelers Choice .
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Darrell Criswell


From:
Maryland, USA
Post  Posted 28 Dec 2018 10:07 am    
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Randy:

Where did you get your love of Bach from?
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Randy Beavers


From:
Lebanon,TN 37090
Post  Posted 29 Dec 2018 8:00 am    
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A sincere thank you to everyone!

I think because music was my “sideline” for so many years, finding things that entertained me led me to look elsewhere for material. Melody always being the most important. Since we were young in school we were exposed to melodies from the classical era and I believe that ingrains itself in us. When you listen to the counterpoint melodies that accompany the lead melody that outlines the chord... well I can get lost in it. Bach’s music may do this the best. It is what we’ve been exposed to the most through television and movies especially during the holidays. There are many other composers that I like as well but there is not enough time in the day. I also wish I was better at reading music. Of course the more I do it the better I get at it. Right now I’m pretty rusty at it.

Once again thanks for the compliments. I’m thankful for them and it inspires me to keep practicing and learning.

Randy
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John Lacey


From:
Black Diamond, Alberta, Canada
Post  Posted 30 Dec 2018 9:34 am    
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Randy what’s been interesting to me of late is how yourself and Travis Toy have been playing C6 type licks on the E 9 neck, quite extensively I might add. Is that a path that you guys have consciously taken, or has it just slipped into your lexicon?
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Randy Beavers


From:
Lebanon,TN 37090
Post  Posted 30 Dec 2018 8:21 pm    
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Hi John, it’s interesting how Travis and I approach this. With me I studied C6 for many years and still do to some degree. The advantage for me was I could already play these things on the C neck so I could literally transpose them a note at a time to the E neck. To me this was an advantage. For Travis he doesn’t play C6th, not that he couldn’t if he wanted to. He’s also a very accomplished guitar player that he can draw from as well. One thing we both have in common is that we don’t hear something and automatically stereotype it as a C6 or E9 sound or song. We just hear it as music and go from there. There’s no magic to either tuning for playing something, it’s all within the 12 notes. On the E tuning you obliviously don’t have the lower notes sometimes, but the top of the chord is still there. I think the biggest obstacle for some might be that we learn two completely different feels for both tunings. Travis hasn’t. He’s always just heard it as music with no preconceived notions that it had to be played on one neck or the other.

I took a break from playing for 7 years or so never touching it. It was in a case in a garage 125 feet off the back of the house. When I got back into it one of the things that bothered me was only being able to do the swing type of feel on the C neck. When I went back on the road with Lee Ann Womack I started playing a SD-10 and I wanted to have those chords, licks, and most importantly the feel under my hands at all times without a C neck. So I went to work on it. After that gig ended there were still many things I could only do on the C neck so during that break I went after those things. Today I feel like I can do things on the E neck I don’t know how to do on the C neck.

This is a hard question to answer and I hope I’ve done it justice. No matter which way you go about it though, knowledge of theory is the only way to get there, IMHO.
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Travis Toy


From:
Nashville, TN, USA
Post  Posted 31 Dec 2018 8:12 am    
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First off...Merry Christmas Randy! One of my favorite players, and I’m glad to call you a friend.

John, I really think Randy summed it up for me already, but I can tell you my specific path. When I started playing steel, the instrument I had was my dad’s MCI, which was a SD-10. Even though I knew a lot of the things I was learning were played on C6th, I never let that stop me from trying to figure them out on E9th. It was all I had, so that was my only option. It is indeed the same 12 notes, and although there are obvious voicing differences, and note range differences, it doesn’t change the building blocks of what makes a chord, or music. You can make any chord on the E9th that you can make on the C6th...it just might be voiced differently. The same with single note lines...you just might have to play a little bit of it in a different octave. Ha. I think E9th is actually largely unexplored by most players, because they default to C6th for any sounds that aren’t stereotypical for that tuning. There are times when I wish I had learned C6th, but honestly, most of the time I’m glad I went down the path I did, because necessity gave me a deeper knowledge of the tuning than most acquire.

I really do think many players are limited by what others have stated should and shouldn’t be played, or can and can’t be played on a particular tuning. That’s a shame, because it’s all there waiting to be discovered, and it’s all just music.

-Travis

P.S. - Side note...that last paragraph also applies to the opposite tuning. E9th sounds on C6th. All there as well. I think Paul has just done a new lesson on that very topic, and I’m sure it’s terrific.


Last edited by Travis Toy on 31 Dec 2018 11:43 am; edited 1 time in total
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John Lacey


From:
Black Diamond, Alberta, Canada
Post  Posted 31 Dec 2018 9:25 am    
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I want to thank both you fellas for responding so elegantly on this subject. I play and enjoy both necks over the years and have always used the C neck as the experimental fun neck. Back in the early 80’s I picked up a U-12 Sho-Bud and made it universal a la Jeff Newman. That sent me down an interesting path that I found was both challenging and frustrating. It made sense because of the univerality of the tuning yet frustrating trying to mentally adapt the 2 tunings into one new one. Also frustrating for me was trying to get that tuning in tune. It culminated into me being asked to do an instrumental (Remington Ride) on a national TV show and it coming out essentially out of tune, not to mention in the key of Eb which made our fiddle player mad. Listening back to that episode made me decide to sell the U12 and go back to a D10, which I did.
I think you guys are right about the preconceived ideas formulating one’s prejudice towards the double tuning when the instrument should really be heading towards a single tuning. By simply playing those notes well and eloquently on the E9 neck, you’ve shown how it could be done. I think that it’s been well worth the effort. Happy New Year to both and I hope to have future conversations with both of you. Thanks also for your video efforts which are much appreciated. Yours truly, John Lacey.
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