| Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com |

Post new topic The minor scale and its chords
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  The minor scale and its chords
Charlie McDonald


From:
out of the blue
Post  Posted 10 Dec 2018 11:52 am    
Reply with quote

If a minor scale includes the major seventh, why is the flat seventh dominant? I'm not trying to be capricious, but if the Eb scale contains a-flat and b-flat,
why are a and b naturals in the relative minor scale?

There are people who know theory better than me; maybe you could respond about what I'm missing. The matter had never come up in 50 years
nor has it been a bother, but now I'm old and demand for everything to work together and yield logical answers. (Maybe I've missed more than I think.)
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brian Hollands


From:
Franklin, North Carolina, USA
Post  Posted 10 Dec 2018 1:30 pm    
Reply with quote

You may be confusing the different types of minor scales a bit. The relative minor of Eb maj is C min. C "natural" minor has all the same notes as Eb maj. C melodic minor uses the A and B natural when ascending and flats both note when descending. C harmonic minor uses the A flat and B natural both up and down.
_________________
'81 Sho-bud LDG
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 10 Dec 2018 2:03 pm    
Reply with quote

Meanwhile, the dominant is G (containing a B natural) while the subdominant is Fm (containing an Ab). This is why the harmonic minor scale is so called - it is used when it is necessary to fit the melody to the three basic chords.
_________________
Homebuilt keyless U12 7x5, Excel keyless U12 8x8, Williams keyless U12 7x8, Telonics mini rack and 15" cabs
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 11 Dec 2018 1:03 am     Re: The minor scale and its chords
Reply with quote

Charlie McDonald wrote:
If a minor scale includes the major seventh, why is the flat seventh dominant?


I agree with the information in the previous responses, but... It’s like, here is the answer to the question we think you are asking.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 11 Dec 2018 2:22 am    
Reply with quote

Charlie should have enough answers now to work out the question Smile
_________________
Homebuilt keyless U12 7x5, Excel keyless U12 8x8, Williams keyless U12 7x8, Telonics mini rack and 15" cabs
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Charlie McDonald


From:
out of the blue
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2018 9:14 am     Re: The minor scale and its chords
Reply with quote

Indeed that is the case. Seldom is a question on the Forum answered so succinctly and conclusively. I understand the distinctions now, and they're reasonable.

Fred Treece wrote:
Charlie McDonald wrote:
If a minor scale includes the major seventh, why is the flat seventh dominant?


I agree with the information in the previous responses, but... It’s like, here is the answer to the question we think you are asking.


It's possible that that is the question. Perhaps I'm trying to mend some rift or riff.

In further thought: I'm listening to a project I just completed, another individual's tunes.
In one tune, I use the dom seventh throughout (almost every chord) although it's the chord I normally avoid at every opportunity. Another tune, I'm using the harmonic minor a the head (and throughout) because it's the one that sounds right?

Thank you for your excellent and informed responses.
Cool.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2018 10:54 am    
Reply with quote

If the tune is in true harmonic minor, and the 1-4-5 chords are Im-IVm-V7, then the harmonic minor scale is absolutely going to work.

If you want to give your dominant seventh scales a jazz twist, try the harmonic minor scale a half step up from the root of the dom7 chord. In other words, play F harmonic minor over E7. Technically, it can still be called an altered E7 dominant scale, featuring b5, #5, #9, and b9. You can get some interesting chord voicings from it that are very easy on pedal steel and resolve to I minor or major nicely.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  
Please review our Forum Rules and Policies
Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction, and steel guitar accessories
www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 S. Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Support This Forum



BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron