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Author Topic:  Your Pick For The Big "E" Of Today
Kevin Fix

 

From:
Michigan, USA
Post  Posted 13 Aug 2018 6:15 pm    
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My pick for the spot that the "Big E" left vacant is, Paul Franklin Jr. Paul, to me, is a big contribution and inspiration to all of us now, just like Buddy was and still is a big contribution and inspiration to all of us. I also am a big fan of Lloyd Green. Lloyd was a massive inspiration to me and many. The wealth of knowledge just keeps flowing continuous from Paul.
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Gregory Etchason

 

From:
Georgia, USA
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 4:08 am    
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It was mid 90's at St. Louis. In large hall off the main room, Jeff Newman was conducting a round robin performance
with Tommy White, Paul Franklin and Hal Rugg. Jeff would start a song and the others would take a run at it.
I was new to steel guitar and very impressionable. But after the show it seemed to me the "only" person on stage was Tommy. This may sound like hyperbole. But I didn't know much about any of them. It was unbiased ears that listened.

My pick is Tommy White with the understanding that discussing another steel player and Buddy at the same time is folly.
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 4:41 am    
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There are some really superpickers today but no one, in my opinion, is in the class of Emmons. Its not a knock on any of the current "big name" pickers.
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Barry Coker


From:
Bagley Alabama, USA
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 5:02 am     The Big "E" of Today?
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To fill the hole in the PSG world left by The "Big E"?
There are several great players today who might be on the
level of Buddy in the preforming area. White, Franklin and Jhonson are all supper player who can mach the notes and play the music but Buddy was so much more.
There is very little about the PSG we play today that Buddy didn't have somthing to do with. What the A,B,C pedals do the addition of knee leavers the F#, D# at 1 & 2.
It is easer to "Immitate" than to "Intovate".
IMO There will always be an empty spot and shoes to BIG to fill.
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Jack Hanson


From:
San Luis Valley, USA
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 5:10 am    
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Russ Pahl.
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Kevin Fix

 

From:
Michigan, USA
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 5:46 am    
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Buddy will and always will be the true pioneer of the pedals and knee's.Their are some massive players out there for sure. Paul seems to me of following the foot steps of Buddy.
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 6:18 am    
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Buck Reid. No question in my mind.
Jerry Byrd: John Ely & Jeff Au Hoy
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Roger Rettig


From:
Naples, FL
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 12:33 pm    
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I've deleted my post which served no purpose.

I refer you to Steve Hinson's and b0b's posts on the next page.
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Last edited by Roger Rettig on 17 Aug 2018 4:46 am; edited 1 time in total
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 1:01 pm    
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Right, there's Tommy and Paul. They are tops. I was so floored when I did Buck's seminar and concert at the PSGA gathering, two Falls ago,
I'm not that familiar with Russ Pahl's playing.
Also great players who play a most excellent Buddy style, Nashville's Mike Daly, Mike Cass, Jay Ganz and I totally forgot Mike Johnson. Also, Steve Palousek. way down Texas way.
I believe Mike Neer has also put a paw or two into Buddy's bag.
Buddy did a great job spawning steelers.

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Last edited by Chris Templeton on 14 Aug 2018 3:58 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 3:50 pm    
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Excuse me. Randy Beavers, Johnny Cox and Zane King delve wonderfully into Buddy's thing, IMHO.
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scott murray


From:
Asheville, NC
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 6:07 pm    
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anyone mention Doug Jernigan yet? I consider him to be the finest and most well-rounded player alive, since we lost Buddy.

Terry Crisp deserves a mention also, he can do it all.
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Jim Cohen


From:
Philadelphia, PA
Post  Posted 14 Aug 2018 7:05 pm    
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I don't care for this question but I will say that every time I've seen Terry Crisp play, it seemed to me that he had Buddy's right hand...
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 1:53 am    
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Terry Crisp and his Crispology!
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Dave Campbell


From:
Nova Scotia, Canada
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 3:19 am    
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...a bit like asking who are today's beatles. buddy came along at a time when the instrument was in its infancy, but also its immediacy. much like the beatles, his creativity was fuelled by the time and place, which i'm doubtful could be recreated. while there are some giant players out there right now, it would be hard to have the same impact that buddy had given the instrument's maturity and the backseat it has taken in popular music.
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 3:27 am    
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I'm with you on that, Dave.
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Roger Rettig


From:
Naples, FL
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 4:20 am    
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Good comment, Dave.
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Jack Strayhorn

 

From:
Winston-Salem, NC
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 4:56 am    
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'Steve Palousek"
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Ian Rae


From:
Redditch, England
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 5:07 am    
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A true successor may not actually be born yet.
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Chris Templeton


From:
The Green Mountain State
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 6:36 am    
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Most definitely Terry Crisp!!!! Ron Elliot on the E9th side of town.
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b0b


From:
Cloverdale, CA
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 8:27 am    
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Dave Campbell wrote:
...a bit like asking who are today's beatles. buddy came along at a time when the instrument was in its infancy, but also its immediacy. much like the beatles, his creativity was fuelled by the time and place, which i'm doubtful could be recreated. while there are some giant players out there right now, it would be hard to have the same impact that buddy had given the instrument's maturity and the backseat it has taken in popular music.

I've always thought of the black album as the steel guitarists' Sgt. Peppers. It showed us what was possible.
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Steve Hinson

 

From:
Hendersonville Tn USA
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 4:57 pm    
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Nobody will have the impact on the development of the instrument that Buddy Emmons had...

Those conditions don't exist today...

There are some phenomenal talents around,but it will take more than that to completely revolutionize the instrument playing-wise,mechanically,tonally,etc...

I don't see it happening...

SH
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Dale Hampton


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 5:34 pm    
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Quote:
Nobody will have the impact on the development of the instrument that Buddy Emmons had...

Those conditions don't exist today...

There are some phenomenal talents around,but it will take more than that to completely revolutionize the instrument playing-wise,mechanically,tonally,etc...

I don't see it happening...

SH


Steve, I don't think that you could have stated it any better.
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W. C. Edgar

 

From:
Phoenix, AZ
Post  Posted 15 Aug 2018 6:30 pm    
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What Jack Stoner said...
No one comes close
No one is an inovator anymore.
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Barry Coker


From:
Bagley Alabama, USA
Post  Posted 16 Aug 2018 3:39 am    
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I disagree Mr. Edgar Innovations come every day Just look at the new Serria guitars. The innovations of today are fine tuning the PSG the changes made by Buddy were huge and ground breaking. The innovaters of today are keeping a great insterment relevent and up to date.
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Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 16 Aug 2018 7:12 am    
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If this discussion were limited to playing, it might be a little easier to make a choice. Buddy took the C6 neck into bebop. Many others have followed and continue to do so, maybe even playing as well as he did. Robert Randolph has taken whatever that tuning is that he uses into hard rock like Hendrix did with guitar, and nobody comes close to his level of playing...yet. Will others follow? That would be the true test of an innovator’s playing style. Otherwise, it is unique and interesting and entertaining, but it may not have an impact on how players actually approach the instrument.
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