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Author Topic:  What does the world need in pedal steel instructional videos
Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 3:41 pm     Reply with quote

Hey ya'll,

So i've put up lots of instructional videos here for free and I will always do so. The forum has given me so much over the years. There is also TONS of great material out there from a lot of great players.

I have a good buddy that is part of Homespun videos and he wants me to do some pedal steel instructional videos for them in the new year. They are in the process of upgrading their whole situation over there.

Generally he is thinking short 5-10 minute videos on particular licks, phrases, rather than a long form "how to play steel" thing.

This will be high quality video and audio with I'm sure at least four cameras... face, right hand, left hand, feet.

I guess they would be somewhat geared for beginners but I'd say all the way up to intermediate level stuff. I'd probably do a volume pedal video, maybe a bit of a right hand video, etc... but then mostly I think he's just wanting to do more of vocabulary... but I don't know. I also said we HAD to have downloadable backing tracks as part of every lesson.

My question to the forum. What should I focus on? Whats underrepresented in the teaching videos out there? Any advice?

Thanks in advance!

Josh Yenne
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Larry Baker


From:
Columbia, Mo. U.S.A.
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 5:29 pm     Reply with quote

How about somethings focusing on chimes?
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 5:37 pm     Reply with quote

ha! I'm TERRIBLE on harmonics!

Laughing
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 5:42 pm     Reply with quote

And I guess as much as actual content advice I"m looking for production advice.... like in the videos what sort of camera angles do you like... what kind of back tracks... tab or no tab (crap i'll probably have to write tab and I HATE doing tab)

Or updates to old videos... theres lots of great instructional material that is so dated is almost impossible to watch... a lot of those 80's videos that have been transferred from VHS and the video is popping and tumbling.. crappy sound thats way far away from 440, distorted audio etc....

i'm just hoping to get some super high quality video and audio.

Backing tracks... does that appeal to you? I can't imagine NOT having back tracks and in fact I'll hope they have the bandwidth where I can have at least 3 speeds of the same track for people to get with each lesson.
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 5:43 pm     Reply with quote

And I'm not disparaging those old videos... but they ARE hard to watch, especially for the younger generations.... even if it is great info. Those were some great players (much better than I) and some good videos thats for sure.
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Jim Cohen


From:
Philadelphia, PA
Post Posted 26 Dec 2017 7:56 pm     Reply with quote

A noble undertaking and offering, Josh! My advice would be to wait a month or two and see what Paul Franklin launches on January 1st with his new online course. That promises to be the most comprehensive thing out there for PSG to date. I suggest you get Homespun to cover the cost of your membership so you can get a very close look at the contents and then decide what you think is missing and would be a good addition to the field.

Just my two cents... Good luck and thanks for wanting to help grow the field!
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Martin Abend


From:
Berlin, Germany
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 1:21 am     Reply with quote

Hi Josh,

Something I miss with most of the instructions (and that may very well be because I haven't found the right courses) is connecting theory with songs. Something like: Here's what the D-lever is doing in theory, and here's a song where you actually can see the lever in effect, if you know what I mean. That I would find very helpful.
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 2:20 am     Reply with quote

Thank you. Yes that makes sense
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Ray Mangrum


From:
Tennessee, USA
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 5:28 am     Suggested Material Reply with quote

How to play scales that fit over different chords. Very simple stuff to start, i.e. 1,1V, V, and then onto more aggressive material, and as someone else pointed out, here's how it may work in this song. Buddy had a thing called the snake scale, but no here's how it works.
Also I think the material that's out is awesome in some ways, but weak,on timing, syncopation.
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Roger Rettig


From:
An Englishman in Naples, FL
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 8:47 am     Reply with quote

In my opinion there is too much emphasis on where certain 'licks' or phrases can be found on the neck (fret/strings/pedals, etc) and nowhere near enough about how to produce a note or notes with the right attack and a good tone.

If a new player is 'led by the nose' with a system of tablature showing him where to find stuff then I don't feel he really learns the tuning. Tone and execution is another matter entirely.
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Patrick Ickes


From:
Upper Lake, CA USA
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 9:08 am     No more tabbed licks Reply with quote

Hey Josh,
3 String grips, chord building/scales/theory, timing using metronome and/or backing tracks, right hand position to optimize string attack/tone.
The hard stuff most seem to avoid!
Patrick
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Paul Stauskas


From:
Grand Prairie, TX
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 11:50 am     Reply with quote

For me, video is not helpful without the top down player's view of the fretboard. Rady Guide (Jeff Rady) offers this camera angle combined with excellent quality video and audio, which is why I subscribe to his website.
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 11:54 am     Reply with quote

these are great guys thanks... keep em coming.
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Bob Bestor


From:
Oregon, USA
Post Posted 28 Dec 2017 9:20 pm     Reply with quote

Technique building exercises. As a new player I imagine that I need to do lots of whatever the pedal steel equivalent is of push ups, sit ups, and flexibility exercises. I figure the more technical mastery I have, the easier it will be to tackle new material. So anything that you can pass on that improves tone, touch, accuracy, ear, speed and more in a wide variety of picking patterns across all strings and the whole neck would be most welcome.

Also, what you are doing now is excellent. I am currently slowly working through the two recent Buddy Cage lessons you put up on youtube. Great stuff and thanks a whole bunch for it!
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Alan Bidmade


From:
Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Post Posted 29 Dec 2017 10:39 am     Reply with quote

Most forms of classical instrument tuition include 'Etudes' - studies. These are often incremental in nature, beginning with fairly easy stuff, getting more complex as the student progresses. I think this is missing from 'random' (although often helpful) video posts of licks, solos etc which often vary in complexity.
I think a series of instructional studies, focusing on a particular technique or lesson, progressing in complexity would be a real asset to learners and intermediates alike.
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Jim Cohen


From:
Philadelphia, PA
Post Posted 29 Dec 2017 10:42 am     Reply with quote

Bob Bestor wrote:
Technique building exercises. As a new player I imagine that I need to do lots of whatever the pedal steel equivalent is of push ups, sit ups, and flexibility exercises. I figure the more technical mastery I have, the easier it will be to tackle new material.

Just FYI, Joe Wright has produced at least 3 books of such material.
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 3 Jan 2018 2:57 pm     Reply with quote

well I saw Franklins course offering and I'm sure it will be SPECTACULAR. Luckily what we are going for it exactly the opposite of that. We will be doing short videos with one piece of digestible lesson in it...

Probably 8-15 minutes long.

Cheap. Short. Not a "course" just one lesson at a time. I know others do this as well.. just hoping to add to the materials out there available and in high quality on the web.

The problem with some courses is that if you already are a intermediate player you may be wasting money on lessons you don't really need. I mean what player of 10+ years needs a lesson on string sets?

This will hopefully work on a lot of levels... if you're just looking for a new phrase to work on you can get a good, inexpensive lesson for something to mess with for the day and add to your vocab. I will also do some beginner technique exercises as well, volume pedal video, etc....
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Roger Rettig


From:
An Englishman in Naples, FL
Post Posted 3 Jan 2018 3:28 pm     Reply with quote

And, of course, he's Paul Franklin. Tips and advice from arguably the best player on the planet have to carry some weight.
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Josh Yenne


From:
Sonoma California
Post Posted 3 Jan 2018 5:26 pm     Reply with quote

yes in no way was I comparing myself to Paul... I'm sure his course is worth every cent... just glad we are doing something completely different structure wise.
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Mark Hershey


From:
New York, USA
Post Posted 3 Jan 2018 6:30 pm     Reply with quote

The one lesson I'm really looking for is someone that can explain the real basics of backing up a country song. I can't find it anywhere -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUQM6OV6cYE

These Conway songs demonstrate what I'm talking about. John Hughey is filling up the verses with such a wonderful sound.

On countless old time country records I hear that sustaining, weeping, swelling haunting sound made by the steel. I hear it on all those old records.

I can find so many lessons on intros, solos but haven't had much luck coming along something that can help me get some ideas of what to do during the verses.
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Mark Hershey


From:
New York, USA
Post Posted 3 Jan 2018 6:34 pm     Reply with quote

I guess the other thing that would be helpful, there's a guitar teacher on youtube that does 'in the mind set of' videos. His name is Ian Stitch. Rather than teaching you the licks he tells you what the artist is doing over the song to the chords and why it works. His idea is to give you this knowledge so you have the tools to make your own music. You'd probably have to watch one to get an idea of what I'm talking about, but that might be useful. At this point in my playing I want more guidance so I can create my own stuff instead of learning old standards and licks.
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Chris Walke


From:
St Charles, IL
Post Posted 4 Jan 2018 5:43 am     Reply with quote

Alan Bidmade wrote:
Most forms of classical instrument tuition include 'Etudes' - studies. These are often incremental in nature, beginning with fairly easy stuff, getting more complex as the student progresses. I think this is missing from 'random' (although often helpful) video posts of licks, solos etc which often vary in complexity.
I think a series of instructional studies, focusing on a particular technique or lesson, progressing in complexity would be a real asset to learners and intermediates alike.


An enthusiastic 2nd here!! I grew up playing trumpet and used the Arban's method. It's the brass players' bible of etudes. Building in complexity, it starts extremely simple and carries the musician down a path that builds from one etude to the next. You can see what I mean here (etudes start on page 11, scroll thru to see how it builds).

http://www.el-atril.com/partituras/Metodos/Complete%20Conservatory%20Method%20for%20Trumpet.pdf

This approach could be broken into key signatures, can focus on specific pedals/levers, open strings vs closed "pockets," and also broken down into beginner/intermediate/advanced.

Could be a huge series.
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Chris Walke


From:
St Charles, IL
Post Posted 4 Jan 2018 5:54 am     Reply with quote

Mark Hershey wrote:
I guess the other thing that would be helpful, there's a guitar teacher on youtube that does 'in the mind set of' videos. His name is Ian Stitch. Rather than teaching you the licks he tells you what the artist is doing over the song to the chords and why it works. His idea is to give you this knowledge so you have the tools to make your own music. You'd probably have to watch one to get an idea of what I'm talking about, but that might be useful. At this point in my playing I want more guidance so I can create my own stuff instead of learning old standards and licks.


Here's another guy - why & how, but not necessarily devoted to a specific song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vL-SgbNGWSc
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Bill Ferguson


From:
Norcross, GA USA
Post Posted 4 Jan 2018 6:30 am     Reply with quote

John,
I highly commend you for what you are planning.

I know several "newbies" that simply can't afford private lessons or the "paid" online lessons.
Heck, many can't even afford a decent steel, but they have the passion to play. And for me, that is the most important part of this addiction we have.

Kudo's to you
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Ed Crimp


From:
British Columbia, Canada
Post Posted 7 Jan 2018 5:13 pm     Reply with quote

I've been watching some C 6th Bobbe Seymour stuff on you tube that doesn't seem to be rehashing the same things over and over. He does alternating base with melodies and chord melody pop tunes. He doesn't really elaborate much but I'd like to know more about that.
Thanks
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