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Post new topic Recording your amp direct question...
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Author Topic:  Recording your amp direct question...
Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 15 Jun 2017 4:28 pm     Reply with quote

I have a Nashville 1000 amp. I use GarageBand and Logic when recording. I use a Presonus Auidobox USB. Most of the time I just plug directly into that and select a reasonable sounding plugin or amp modler. What I would like to do is plug into my amp, and my effects and directly into the Auidobox so I can get that sound. What's the simplest way to do that??

Robbie Bossert
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Bryan Daste


From:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Post Posted 15 Jun 2017 10:38 pm     Reply with quote

You could put the effects in front of the amp & then run an XLR from the line out of the Peavey. Or just stick an SM57 on the amp.
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 2:33 am     Reply with quote

I don't like to record "wet" (with whatever effects). Trouble with that is if you want to change anything you are stuck with what you have or you have to redo the track (or sometimes the entire session). If you record "dry" (no effects) then you can add whatever you want to it. Even "reamp" with effects (run the dry track out to an amp and effects and then back into a new track.

There are those on both sides of this. Some want it dry and others want whatever amp/effects.
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Tony Prior


From:
Charlotte NC..
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 3:01 am     Reply with quote

While what Jack says is totally correct, the other side to the equation is simplicity. If you really like the sound of what you've got , effects ahead of the recorder , it's amazing how much time it saves on the back end trying to FIND the sound you like !

I do a little of both but these days, one of my preamps, which is a DBX 376 channel strip, has a 4 band para EQ and a compressor, I track with the sound dialed in with that preamp. Additionally when tracking the slide, I use a Sparkle Drive ahead of the preamp, I track the tones that I want. Now with regard to reverbs or delays, yes, thats at the end during the mix process.

It's amazing how much back end noodling can be eliminated by tracking the tones that you want right from the get go.

But, neither method or process is right or wrong.

What Jack states though is 100% correct, if you indeed track something with "things" added, thats it. If you're good with that then all is good, if not, well then we have to deal with it.
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Greg Cutshaw


From:
Corry, PA, USA
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 3:54 am     Reply with quote

You can easily edit a track that has been recorded with reverb later. Just edit out the part you don't want then add DAW reverb to form a reverb tail to the end of the edited part. Then add in the new part with reverb. I do this all the time. It can be done with delay as well. Totally seamless!

Last edited by Greg Cutshaw on 16 Jun 2017 9:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 4:46 am     Reply with quote

I've probably recorded steel every way possible over the years. For backup (with a singer) My "go to" at the moment is the steel to a SansAmp (which also acts as a DI) to my recording interface unit. No effects. I have Line 6 POD Farm 2 and it has some good spring reverbs and even a fairly good Echoplex model for delay. I also have Lexicon Reverb VST's that I can get the Lexicon type reverbs. I find I don't need to EQ the steel track, usually just a slight bit of reverb.

One way I didn't mention, is record two tracks at the same time, one dry and the other with whatever you want to add. You can then select which one you want when you mixdown.

My recording interface unit is an MOTU 896Mk3 Hybrid (USB 2.0 and Firewire interfaces) with 8 analog preamps. Thus I usually have enough channels to record both wet and dry at the same time if I want.

I have Ozone 5 and 6 for mastering
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Bill Terry


From:
Bastrop, TX
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 9:21 am     Reply with quote

Quote:
One way I didn't mention, is record two tracks at the same time, one dry and the other with whatever you want to add. You can then select which one you want when you mixdown.


I agree with Jack. I've requested this on a couple of sessions I've done lately (not that I'm some big session guy, I'm not), and I've found that these days most engineers don't have any problem with doing it that way. In their world it's trivial.

At mix time I've seen the amp sound used, the direct sound used with post-processing using amp sims, verbs, etc., or both mixed (which requires a little attention regarding phase). It gives you a lot of flexibility and it's not hard to do in a home studio.
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Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 1:31 pm     Reply with quote

Hey Bryan, Thanks for the XLR suggestion. That was exactly what I was looking for. Thank all you guys for chiming in. Very enlightening. Question for Jack Stoner. I like the idea oe recording a wet and a dry track at the same time. How would I do that? I have a Presonus interface with 2 inputs. Would I run one line from my volume pedal to the amp, and XLR into one input and then one line directly from the pedal to the other input bypassing everything? That would be my dry track correct?

Robbie...
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 16 Jun 2017 2:23 pm     Reply with quote

Yes that sounds right. Just be careful of a ground loop hum. It would be better to run the dry from the volume pedal to a D.I. box (that has a ground lifter in case you need it) and then to the Presonus.
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Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 17 Jun 2017 5:05 am     Reply with quote

Thanks Jack.. I was getting a bit of hum with going direct from the Amp to the Presonus. I went in and turned off all of the plugins and that seemed to take care of it...Thanks for all the help. I appreciate it...

Robbie
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 17 Jun 2017 5:08 am     Reply with quote

Thanks. Glad to help a fellow "Keystoner".
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Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 17 Jun 2017 6:32 am     Reply with quote

Oh...Are you from Polkavania?

Robbie
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 17 Jun 2017 6:41 am     Reply with quote

Mechanicsburg (Harrisburg area)
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Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 17 Jun 2017 6:43 am     Reply with quote

Sure... I've been there many times..
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Godfrey Arthur


From:
Philippines
Post Posted 15 Jul 2017 5:54 am     Reply with quote

Robbie Bossert wrote:
I went in and turned off all of the plugins and that seemed to take care of it...


When you say you turned off all your plugins did you mean the ones in your software session?

If so, the hum was still there just not amplified. or you have a single coil doing its usual voodoo on your guitar sound. As mentioned having a direct box with a ground lift usually fixes the problem. Use your meters within your recording software on your particular instrument track to note if you are getting hum as you will see some read on the meter even if you're not playing.. Hitting a ground lift switch will make those few db of meter readings disappear which means the hum is gone. If your single coil is the culprit as Jerry Wallace told me, a humbucker might be the better solution for the hum problem.Crying or Very sad

Tony Prior wrote:

It's amazing how much back end noodling can be eliminated by tracking the tones that you want right from the get go.


This is in essence is what you want to go for. Setting up a mic in front of a speaker involves the same ear processing of finding the sweet spot to get the tones you might want to hear as it does going direct. Have to consider the end result of your recorded piece and design how you want it to sound as you build tracks.

Here's a little hand to ear coordination courtesy of Brian Wampler:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcnXKXIZxLg&spfreload=10
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Robbie Bossert


From:
WESCOSVILLE,PA,U.S.A.
Post Posted 16 Jul 2017 10:11 am     Reply with quote

Thanks Godfrey... All great stuff...

Robbie
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