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Post new topic Feelings on Jumping Ship from old to new
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Author Topic:  Feelings on Jumping Ship from old to new
Ray Jenkins


From:
Gold Canyon Az. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 23 Oct 2014 6:19 pm    
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Matthew,reading this stuff warms the cockles of your heart. Ain't it kinda hard to play with hot cockles? Surprised
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Ray Jenkins


From:
Gold Canyon Az. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 23 Oct 2014 6:21 pm    
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Matthew,reading this stuff warms the cockles of your heart. Ain't it kinda hard to play with hot cockles? Surprised
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Craig Schwartz


From:
McHenry IL
Post  Posted 23 Nov 2014 10:28 am    
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it's been about a month and a half and now I've got 19 songs shortly tabbed with my chicken scratch.

Heres what ive noticed:
The use of many minors
Never can figure out the 1 chord easily
Everything is fast
You become a lead player alot
Everyone thinks your fabulous on steel, hahaha little do they know .
Thought of gettin fired seems more likely for some reason (could be more in my own head and I dont care !!! )
A crappy guitar and amp doesnt matter as long as you know how to play, they want your sound through the PA always.
They basically all think your superman...
Theres a whole different game here.
ALOT of learning is happening for me and this new stuff keeps you on your toes, Thank God for the VP!!!
believe it or not, its been kinda fun,
whats up with all the minors ?
forget I asked that.
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Tim Fleming


From:
Pasadena, CA. The other Rose City
Post  Posted 23 Nov 2014 5:39 pm    
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Craig, I'm in the same situation as you - young band, all current radio hits for set lists.

At first I didn't think I could stand the sheer loudness of it all (I hate playing the steel loudly) but I have assimilated and am really enjoying myself.
The band is very good and gets the primo gigs - we work a lot and are paid well!

I also contribute on b@nj0 and mandolin, so I add the only true "country" color to the music. Every other song on country radio features b@nj0 nowadays, weird...

The chord progressions are almost all the same - take Wagon Wheel and mix the chords up any which way and you have a hit.
As for the songs themselves, most are pop pablum but there are several well-written and poignant lyrics to keep me interested, at least for now.

Riding this train 'till they find a younger, better-looking guy or until I can't take it any more : )
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Craig Schwartz


From:
McHenry IL
Post  Posted 24 Nov 2014 6:23 am    
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Tim, You are the country superman,
yes bringing in that country color with banjo and mandolin is really needed with some of these songs,
I've been playin around with my banjo because of its need in the mix.
Getting to 7 people on a small stage aint gonna work out so easy.

Question:
Is there an easy way to locate the 1 chord ?
with flats sharps and minors everywhere , Im having major problems with comping these tunes. The leads seem easy.
HELP !!! SINKING FAST without a life vest...
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Bob Hoffnar


From:
Austin, Tx
Post  Posted 24 Nov 2014 9:10 am    
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The minors, flats and sharps are as generally straight diatonic chords. The most common new country progression works around 1, V7, vi, IV. Everything can be broken down to I, IV, V if you look at it right.

I chord
ii chord is almost a IV
iii chord is almost a V
IV
V
vi almost a I
vii almost a V

The main thing is avoid the constant classic country thing of always pivoting on a dom 7 and squeezing the pedals every chance you get. Try simple pads with no vibrato and maybe leave out the thirds. Single note lines tend to blend better sometimes and harmonics are money in the bank.
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David Mason


From:
Cambridge, MD, USA
Post  Posted 24 Nov 2014 11:14 am    
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It may be worth remembering that a lot of the younger guys have had no real reason to be exposed to classic country, unless it ran deep in their family. They are singing songs about "listenin' to Hank and Bob Wills and Merle" without having ever done it.

Have you considered that you may be there for a reason? It may be useful to teach them how to add the country....
Quote:
after a couple days of practice in the new set list I threw on the Bakersfield album just to suit how I felt about it and my heart went crazy I just love that album that's real music.

Play it for them.
I don't advocate stealing but if they had a few potential "new" set list songs to listen to in the their cars or trucks, well...
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Bob Hoffnar


From:
Austin, Tx
Post  Posted 25 Nov 2014 12:20 am    
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The main fun for me when I play with rock bands is that my role is different. I can add texture and color, double the bass line or just about anything that seems like it will help the sound. The musical role of pedalsteel is gone so I am given the freedom to create a new role that may not involve noodling around the vocals. I can work within the sound of the band and hang with the drummer instead of waiting for my chance to play some twangy fill.

I find it exciting and musically fulfilling when I get to drop the whole pedalsteel guitar as country music cliche machine bit. It is more fun to learn new things than try to get people to change so I can play a few licks I already know.

I have been playing tons of country gigs and I absolutely love it but it is big world out there.
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John Billings


From:
Ohio, USA
Post  Posted 26 Nov 2014 1:17 pm    
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"finds a song suitable as a metronomic soundtrack for their rote routines is a far cry from qualifying said song as having a "cool groove". YMMV."

We'd get asked to play ABH 5 times a night! The 5th time I would get the band to add an extra beat to the last measure of the stupid guitar solo. Hilarious to watch as chaos ensued on the dance floor!

Cockles are those little "clams" you're gonna hit sooner or later!
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Bob Snelgrove


From:
san jose, ca
Post  Posted 30 Nov 2014 6:24 pm    
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John McClung wrote:
Craig, when I played "Pontoon" (Little Big Town) in a band, I used a detuned patch from my Zoom 50G stompbox to get a reasonable facsimile of the mandolin that plays all the little lines throughout the song, starting with the intro. The band loved that sound. Had a bit of non-detuned blended with detuned. A chorus could also work in the same way. Or a delay with modulation options.


John

I just picked up that box. Can you post or pm me those or some other settings? I got a pretty convincing Dobro with the acoustic sim and the up/down slider EQ trick.

thx

bob
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Stuart Legg


Post  Posted 1 Dec 2014 2:45 pm    
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I watch guitar players on you tube literally doing unbelievable fantastic things in every imaginable genre.
I see an endless number of fantastic in detail guitar lessons on about any genre song out there.
I read a verity of guitar player’s magazines and online articles by guitar players going into great detail regarding how to and the theory behind these songs of every genre.
They seem to enjoy sharing with each other in depth discussions and theory that they can certainly back up what they talk about with their playing.
Steel players seem to go into a genre unprepared and expect the genre to change to accommodate them and come back crying when it don’t go their way.
Genre…..learn the language, learn the theory so you can explain it to other steel players.
Don’t act like you’ve been there before until you’ve really been there before.
Right now the guitar players are eating the steel players lunch in every genre and really just in general the guitar players are a lot smarter musically speaking than steel players because steel players just sit around with the idea that a little knowledge will hurt their playing.
As a result the steel player has to reinvent the wheel in every genre they try to play….“the dumber I am the better I’ll play“
Of course I'm speaking IMHO and in general here. Sorry but sometime the truth bites!!
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Randy Sevearance


From:
Crouse, North Carolina, USA
Post  Posted 2 Dec 2014 7:51 pm     jumping ship
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Craig its good to hear that you are one that is playing new country music.I have done it for a few years now and playing with 2 bands and making a little better money too. Not to say pedal steel is in almost every other song you hear now, its just not as dominant asthe classics but its fun and ddifferent I really love and keeps steel guitar somewhere in music too.
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Randy Sevearance


From:
Crouse, North Carolina, USA
Post  Posted 2 Dec 2014 7:53 pm     jumping ship
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Craig its good to hear that you are one that is playing new country music.I have done it for a few years now and playing with 2 bands and making a little better money too. Not to say pedal steel is in almost every other song you hear now, its just not as dominant asthe classics but its fun and ddifferent I really love and keeps steel guitar somewhere in music too.
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Quentin Hickey


Post  Posted 12 Dec 2014 6:06 am    
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Well stated Stuart!

I like to use diatonic chord progression(thats utilizing the minor chord where they belong) and knowing a little about you pentatonic pockets will go a long way on slow and ballad songs. Most up beat and medium to fast tempo stuff is relatively easy as it sticks to some kind of reliable chord prog.
One of the biggest factors in becoming a successful musician is continuously studying your insturnment and not being just content with a small amount of licks you can play. Put some work in and do your homework. Knowing the chord progressions and studying them. Not just relying on the same old generic licks that you've been playing for the last 25 years. Challenge yourself.
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Larry Behm


From:
Mt Angel, Or 97362
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2014 8:35 am    
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ALL of you are right on the money with your prospective. Adapt or stay home! Branch out or sell it!

I have a recent post about being in love with the sound of the steel no mater what type of music you are playing.

I too have come from and am going back to this type of band, it is challenging but, I am still playing out, I know the band members, it pays ok.

Think like Buddy, horn lines, vamps, effects. Have fun, enjoy the dancers.
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Jack Hanson


From:
San Luis Valley, USA
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2014 10:10 am    
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chris ivey wrote:
aaaagghhhh.........spare me....!!!
flute is my least favorite sound in the universe from a happenin' get-down perspective.

chris, have you ever listened to this record?

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Bill Sinclair


From:
Hagerstown, Maryland, USA
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2014 11:18 am    
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chris, have you ever listened to this record?

[/quote]

Yikes! My sister used to have that album. She put contact paper over the cover. Shocked What was Herbie thinking?
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Bill Sinclair


From:
Hagerstown, Maryland, USA
Post  Posted 12 Dec 2014 11:19 am    
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Maybe it was: "I'm too sexy for my shirt, too sexy for my shirt"
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