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Post new topic Laying down a brass fretboard
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Author Topic:  Laying down a brass fretboard
Mark Helm


From:
Tennessee, USA
Post  Posted 4 Aug 2020 7:58 pm    
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Gang:

I'm in the process of putting down a brass (I believe it's brass... it's Fender from the late 40s) fretboard I reclaimed from a destroyed guitar onto a working guitar that had a ruined fretboard.

As it's old, it's not quite as "flat" as it used to be.
At present I've piled a lot of heavy books on top for several days to help ensure it lays flat.

Anyone know any other tricks to get it to lay flat to the wood? Even though I'll be tacking it down in the usual places, I'm afraid it may not lay flat in some places. Did hey use adhesive of any kind back in the day?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
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Fender Dual Professional (trap pickups), Fender Stringmaster T8, Vox MV-50 amplifier + an 1940's Oahu cab w/ 8" American Vintage speaker. Hofner Club bass, Epiphone Masterbilt Century DeLuxe archtop (VERY lovely guitar once it's set up correctly), Ibanez AVN4-VMS Artwood Vintage Series Parlor Acoustic Guitar (best $500 acoustic I ever played!). 1920s/30s Supertone Hawaiian-themed parlor guitar. Silvertone parlor guitar.
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Donny Hinson

 

From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 6 Aug 2020 1:42 am    
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Some people use the red Scotch or 3-M "trim tape", which is double-sided tape used to fasten trim on cars, boats, and trucks. You can buy small rolls of various widths at any large auto parts store for around $7-$10. It sticks like crazy and has good temperature resistance, compared to most standard double-sided tapes. Two strips along the length of the fretboard will usually suffice. Remember to clean both surfaces with alcohol before you apply the tape, and position the fretboard very carefully. Once it's "stuck", it's almost impossible to move.

I've also used Scotch #410M layup tape, which is sometimes used in machine shops, and it comes in bigger rolls. But that's a pretty expensive purchase for a single use.
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Ross Shafer


From:
Petaluma, California
Post  Posted 6 Aug 2020 6:31 am    
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You should be able to get that bow out by, putting the fret board concave side down on some fairly thin (1/4"-3/8")and dense foam and going back and forth over it with a rolling pin from the kitchen....or something similar (don't use too small a diameter).

Start gently, examine your results, get medieval on it as needed. Thicker foam will make it happen quicker but may result in bowing it the other way too much.

Good luck!
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Peter Harris

 

From:
South Australia, Australia
Post  Posted 7 Aug 2020 5:52 am    
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Ross Shafer wrote:
You should be able to get that bow out by, putting the fret board concave side down on some fairly thin (1/4"-3/8")and dense foam and going back and forth over it with a rolling pin from the kitchen....or something similar (don't use too small a diameter).

Start gently, examine your results, get medieval on it as needed. Thicker foam will make it happen quicker but may result in bowing it the other way too much.

Good luck!



...or getting beaten over the head by the owner of the Rolling Pin...

Good luck with that too.... Shocked
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