| Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com |

Post new topic We maybe done for Boys!
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  We maybe done for Boys!
Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 7 Jul 2019 9:46 pm    
Reply with quote

Brooks Montgomery wrote:
I have a crazy friend who has an act called “Drum Machine”.
He’s a drummer. He drums on his kit and tells jokes. The rest of the band are mannequins, with recorded BIAB music, with mic stands.

Does he get gigs? I’m an unemployed mannequin with Garage Band experience.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brooks Montgomery


From:
Idaho, USA
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 2:41 am    
Reply with quote

Fred Treece wrote:
Brooks Montgomery wrote:
I have a crazy friend who has an act called “Drum Machine”.
He’s a drummer. He drums on his kit and tells jokes. The rest of the band are mannequins, with recorded BIAB music, with mic stands.

Does he get gigs? I’m an unemployed mannequin with Garage Band experience.

He asked if you can eternally keep a “big sale on Thursday” smile on your face.
And , oh yeh, no bathroom breaks.
_________________
A banjo, like a pet monkey, seems like a good idea at first.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Roy Carroll


From:
North of a Round Rock
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 4:55 am    
Reply with quote

Let me preface what I am about to say with this... I believe in the old school method of using a live player on steel, because I are one and make part of my living with a steel guitar. However, if you were to play that track for 25 non-steel players, 99.9% would say that is a steel guitar making that sound, if you played them a steel guitar track ahead of time. The general public has no clue. The vast majority of them have no musical ability and have tin ears. Most could not carry a tune in a bucket, much less tell the difference in a synth guitar and a real one. I could see this thing being used for demos and garage bands for recording their songs. This will never replace a real player in quality,EVER however, where money is involved, this may cut out some players for demo sessions. If you bury it in the mix, as most recordings are doing, it is a decent representation that most people would not know the difference. How about the producers that only wants pads and slides? Jus' sayin'. Flame on!
_________________
Just north of the Weird place, south of Georgetown
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brooks Montgomery


From:
Idaho, USA
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 5:17 am    
Reply with quote

“When the Impossible Whopper becomes Soylent Green,
And a real drummer is called Drum Machine,
That’s when real pedal steel becomes a passing dream”.
_________________
A banjo, like a pet monkey, seems like a good idea at first.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Joe Krumel


From:
Nashville,TN.
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 5:28 am    
Reply with quote

Thats pretty good Brooks!
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tom Cooper


From:
Orlando, Fl
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 6:04 am     Fake steel
Reply with quote

This is perfect for today’s soulless bro country and wimpy singer songwriters. Good. They won’t call me. I will keep doing my same gigs, and same alt country ppl will hit me up to play on their record. None of these trendy computer fads mean anything to me. I get more offers to play than I can even do. Live in a noisy barrroom with an old push pull and an LTD 400. That’s where I will be. Like fake amps, this is just toys for ppl who actually like computers. I don’t. Give me my big iron and a bar gig somewhere. This is a big yawn for me. If ppl dig it that’s ok. Room for everyone. It’s great. Just not very interesting to me. I will get the same work I always have. Nothing will change.
View user's profile Send private message
Barry Blackwood


Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 7:51 am    
Reply with quote

Go Tom! 👍
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
James Mayer


From:
back in Portland Oregon, USA (via Arkansas and London, UK)
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 8:40 am    
Reply with quote

Is anyone else considering installing a MIDI pickup on their steel to control this software? If you have any success, please let me know. Thanks.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Lee Baucum


From:
McAllen, Texas (Extreme South) The Final Frontier
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 9:33 am    
Reply with quote

Quote:
Some killer stuff going on of course, but lots of crappage also.


"crappage"

I learned a new word today. I love it!
_________________
Lee, from South Texas - Down On The Rio Grande

There are only two options as I see it.
Either I'm right, or there is a sinister conspiracy to conceal the fact that I'm right.


Williams Keyless S-10, BMI S-10, Evans FET-500LV, Fender Steel King, 2 Roland Cube 80XL's,
Sarno FreeLoader, Goodrich Passive Volume Pedals, Vintage ACE Pack-A-Seat
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Bob Carlucci


From:
Candor, New York, USA
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 12:08 pm    
Reply with quote

Roy Carroll wrote:
Let me preface what I am about to say with this... I believe in the old school method of using a live player on steel, because I are one and make part of my living with a steel guitar. However, if you were to play that track for 25 non-steel players, 99.9% would say that is a steel guitar making that sound, if you played them a steel guitar track ahead of time. The general public has no clue. The vast majority of them have no musical ability and have tin ears. Most could not carry a tune in a bucket, much less tell the difference in a synth guitar and a real one. I could see this thing being used for demos and garage bands for recording their songs. This will never replace a real player in quality,EVER however, where money is involved, this may cut out some players for demo sessions. If you bury it in the mix, as most recordings are doing, it is a decent representation that most people would not know the difference. How about the producers that only wants pads and slides? Jus' sayin'. Flame on!




Exactly.. That abomination would have done just as well as I did in 90% of my studio sessions over the decades, because my steel parts were just a "pad, a flavor, a hint, "icing n the cake"-that sort of crap.

It will replace a few guys in local sessions I am sure.. Will it decrease orders on new steels?.. Highly doubtful... bob
_________________
I'm over the hill and hittin'rocks on the way down!

no gear list for me.. you don't have the time......
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Fred Treece


From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 1:55 pm    
Reply with quote

The pathetic thing about this and other “music-making” software (like Garage Band, BIAB, and Shreddage) is that the operator may never know how it feels to actually play the instrument being emulated, and the accompanying joy and thrill that entails. Making the sound is not the same as playing the instrument.

Of course, purist players like me and apparently many others here, may never know what the keyboardist/computer operator is experiencing either. Maybe they think they’re actually playing steel, who knows. I know a guy that “creates” his own karaoke tracks, and thinks that clicking the menu button that alters the midi track playback is a compositional skill. Is that progress? Is that evolution? I think it’s another reason to just shake my head and plod on like I always have in spite of it, because I actually like playing the real instrument and feel kinda sorry for the toy operators.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Mitch Ellis


From:
Collins, Mississippi USA
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 5:57 pm    
Reply with quote

Fish wrote:
But there is zero personality here; a keyboardist can't emulate the touch and soul of a Mooney or Emmons or Green.


It will never happen.

Mitch
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Marc Jenkins


From:
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Post  Posted 8 Jul 2019 10:31 pm    
Reply with quote

My goodness those demos sound awful!! That’s not music to me, it’s a product.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim Park


From:
Carson City, Nv
Post  Posted 10 Jul 2019 2:42 pm     Steel synth
Reply with quote

I think the younger generations will look at the program as easier to learn than sitting down at a steel and learning it and it’s much cheaper... there is a lot of synthesized music these days, especially in film. These programs are here to stay, and they will get better. In the meantime I’ll stick to listening to Emmons/Pennington...
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Damir Besic


From:
Nashville,TN.
Post  Posted 11 Jul 2019 2:44 am    
Reply with quote

hey, at least he’s in tune ...
_________________
www.steelguitarsonline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Richard Sinkler


From:
aka: Rusty Strings -- Missoula, Montana
Post  Posted 11 Jul 2019 8:26 am    
Reply with quote

We can all hate it and bitch and moan all we want (I don't like the idea either), but remember that the recording business at large really don't give a rat's ass what we think. There are the handful of producers that do care, but we have been seeing a decline in those in recent years, everywhere, even in Nashville. Basically, we just need to get over it.
_________________
CLICK HERE to visit my website with Mickey Adams videos.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Roger Rettig


From:
Naples, FL
Post  Posted 11 Jul 2019 1:30 pm    
Reply with quote

Fred Treece' comment above reminded me of something I once heard a Dee-Jay say: "I can can all sorts of musical genres - I'm really versatile..."

Whoa!
_________________
RR
Emmons LG3 D-10, Zum Encore
(Real men play 'Day'!)


-------------------------
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Bob Ricker


From:
Nashville Tn
Post  Posted 11 Jul 2019 3:39 pm    
Reply with quote

There has been Pedal Steel software with licks and swells in programs like Logic Pro/Garage Band for a long time.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Rick Campbell


From:
Sneedville, TN, USA
Post  Posted 11 Jul 2019 6:41 pm    
Reply with quote

Whether we like it or not, the most successful of the next generation of producers and engineers will be the ones that are experts at computer assisted music.

I use it all the time in my home studio with Band In Box, MIDI programs, drum loops, and all kinds of digital software and devices. I try to play all the lead parts that I can, and do the vocals. I'd prefer a live band to work with, but that's not feasible for me to do. It's the end result bottom line that matters. I've found that the huge majority of listeners don't know the difference, and they dont really care how you got there. What's important to them is that they enjoy listening to it.

RC
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
David Langdon


From:
West Bridgford, Nottingham Notts, United Kingdom
Post  Posted 12 Jul 2019 7:34 am    
Reply with quote

The first demo of this has the intro part for 'Emmylou' by the Swedish duo First Aid Kit. I wonder if Melvin Duffy has seen this or knows about it as he played the original steel part. I think my point is no matter how good a software package might sound, you need to have the mind and inventiveness of a steel player for it to ever work. Even simple 'pads' take some thinking about to sound right.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Brian Hollands


From:
Franklin, North Carolina, USA
Post  Posted 12 Jul 2019 8:02 am    
Reply with quote

Fred Treece wrote:
The pathetic thing about this and other “music-making” software (like Garage Band, BIAB, and Shreddage) is that the operator may never know how it feels to actually play the instrument being emulated, and the accompanying joy and thrill that entails. Making the sound is not the same as playing the instrument.


I think it's even more than this. Was just thinking this morning and, as good as modern synths are (I was listening to a record with a Fender Rhodes sound on it) that I kind of feel sorry for kids these days.
When I was in my early 20's in Birmingham, there was a local mostly cover band I used to see a lot called Bud Greene...
Those guys used to hall a real B3 and Leslie around with them to every dinky bar they played. Being able to stand right in front of that rig, hear it, feel it, really appreciate it is something I still think very fondly of. Kids these days have little to no chance of ever experiencing that.
_________________
'81 Sho-bud LDG
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Earnest Bovine


From:
Los Angeles CA USA
Post  Posted 12 Jul 2019 8:14 am    
Reply with quote

Damir Besic wrote:
hey, at least he’s in tune ...


That's why I thought it sounds better than me. Also I like that you can play any bend right away without having to put the instrument on the work bench for 3 hours first.
View user's profile Send private message
Curt Trisko


From:
St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Post  Posted 12 Jul 2019 9:43 am    
Reply with quote

Brian Hollands wrote:
Fred Treece wrote:
The pathetic thing about this and other “music-making” software (like Garage Band, BIAB, and Shreddage) is that the operator may never know how it feels to actually play the instrument being emulated, and the accompanying joy and thrill that entails. Making the sound is not the same as playing the instrument.


I think it's even more than this. Was just thinking this morning and, as good as modern synths are (I was listening to a record with a Fender Rhodes sound on it) that I kind of feel sorry for kids these days.
When I was in my early 20's in Birmingham, there was a local mostly cover band I used to see a lot called Bud Greene...
Those guys used to hall a real B3 and Leslie around with them to every dinky bar they played. Being able to stand right in front of that rig, hear it, feel it, really appreciate it is something I still think very fondly of. Kids these days have little to no chance of ever experiencing that.


And it eliminates the most ironic and depressing part of music - spending countless of hours of intense effort and frustration to learn an instrument and thousands of dollars in gear just to have no one care. Laughing
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dave Hopping


From:
Colorado, USA
Post  Posted 19 Jul 2019 12:34 pm    
Reply with quote

One word...."Meh".
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Ryan Zimmerman


From:
Pennsylvania, USA
Post  Posted 27 Jul 2019 5:59 am    
Reply with quote

I don't see this taking off for live work; it'd be a ton of work to play this real time. As far as manually sequencing a few backup licks and maybe a turnaround for a recording where the pedal steel isn't the focus, yeah, it'll pass for most people.

I sure pity whoever got stuck with the job of playing all those random notes to make the samples that power this software. Neutral
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website

All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  
Please review our Forum Rules and Policies
Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction, and steel guitar accessories
www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 S. Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Click Here to Send a Donation


BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron