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Author Topic:  Is Temperature Control Critical in a Studio
Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 7:33 am    
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I don't know if this is the right place for this question or not. I have an out building I use as a studio for just home use but do have instruments recording gear computer etc. I have a Gibson Console Grande D-8 and wondering if the temp hot or cold is a negative impact on the wood. Next the amps, players, computers etc. I have air conditioning and a space heater but do not leave them on 24/7. Thanks. Oh, I had a computer tech tell me one time heat was the worst thing for computers is what caused me to ask this question. Is cold just as bad. Thanks again.
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 8:49 am    
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All I know is that it's hard to play guitar while wearing chopper mitts. Whoa!
Erv
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Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 8:53 am    
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You always have razor soup for breakfast don't you Erv. Yep, I agree. Heck I might sound better if all the strings were muted. Seriously, I was talking about turning the heat off on cold nights and leave it off on days I was not over there. I do like you humor though. B safe
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 9:00 am    
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Steve,
Thanks for putting up with me, but I'm like you, I have a music loft over the garage and I turn down the heat when I'm not up there.
When I want to make some noise, it takes a while for the pedal steel to warm up and it doesn't sound quite right until it does. Very Happy
Erv
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Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 9:32 am    
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Erv: I know you have some solid wood body lap steels or use to anyway. Do you think the cold weather damages the wood if left in a cold room for awhile without heat?
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 9:39 am    
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I don't think it damages the wood but it could damage the finish, especially up here on the tundra.
I remember taking a Fender bass in from the cold and let it warm up too fast, it cracked the finish. Whoa!
Erv
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Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 10:16 am    
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Thanks Erv. 1 below wind chill and 12 here this morning. All I want.
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 4 Mar 2019 10:18 am    
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That's nothing!
10 below zero up here on the tundra this morning and that's not windchill! Very Happy
Erv
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Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 5 Mar 2019 9:49 am    
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Hey Erv: FYI. I sent an e-mail to Gibson and they responded by saying they keep their factory at 70* and 45% humidity. They thought humidity was equally important as well. Also recommended keeping instruments in case when not in use.
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post  Posted 5 Mar 2019 10:25 am    
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Steve,
I read that Gibson moved their acoustic guitar factory to Montana because they felt that Montana had the perfect climate for building acoustic instruments. Very Happy
Erv
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Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post  Posted 5 Mar 2019 12:00 pm    
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I used to live in KC, MO. I wouldn't leave my instruments (guitars, pedal steel, keyboard) or a computer and other recording equipment in area that is not temperature controlled. Being cold, then warming up can be just as bad on electronics and cause failures. May not cause immediate failures but down the road. I always took my instruments out of my car and carried them into the house regardless of whether it was the cold winter or the typical hot 100 degree summers in KC.

I worked (part time) for "Big K" records recording studio in KC and he kept the building between 65 and 75 year round. I was the studio's tech and also staff steel guitar.
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Godfrey Arthur


From:
3rd Rock
Post  Posted 28 Mar 2019 12:20 pm    
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I would say that musical instruments are like humans. They feel right at human temperatures.

A computer is better chilled when running. Some studios have computer rooms or "machine rooms" that are kept chilled. It could be a narrow closet sized room with a dedicated air-conditioner just for the PC's.

But with faster and quieter computers, things are getting cooler and quieter.

Running a studio is not a low cost undertaking.

If you sound proofed your room, you most likely insulated it as part of the sound proofing process. So the temperature changes would be slower than a room that was just 2x4 walls with plaster board.

Humidity is definitely an issue. The higher the humidity, the harder it is to keep a room cool. An air-conditioner's job is to remove moisture from the air as part of the cooling process. Too much moisture bad for musical instruments. Not enough moisture is bad too. A hygrometer lets you know how much humidity is in the air.

Some ducted type air cons have "re-heater" elements that reheat the air to dehumidify it. But then while the dehumidifying going on, the cooling system is working to counteract that process. Power bill?

Maslow's hierarchy of needs.



Owning and running a studio and having a collection of musical instruments is at the fifth level. You need to have the basics secured and that means having the expendable wherewithal to build and maintain a studio properly.

You could turn the heater down and wear a parka.

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Steve Duke


From:
Missouri, USA
Post  Posted 30 Mar 2019 8:39 pm    
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Godfrey: My studio is insulated with two window air units but no windows ( opening in walls). Portable heaters. Bought a portable dehumidifier. Unbelievable how much moisture is in the air.
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Godfrey Arthur


From:
3rd Rock
Post  Posted 30 Mar 2019 10:27 pm    
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Steve Duke wrote:
Godfrey: My studio is insulated with two window air units but no windows ( opening in walls). Portable heaters. Bought a portable dehumidifier. Unbelievable how much moisture is in the air.


Steve, Sears used to sell those large dehumidifiers that look like laundry hampers. Those got full in a hurry. Surprised

Today might need a couple.

Deserts are flooded these days.


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Joe Cook


From:
Whidbey Island Washington, USA
Post  Posted 31 Mar 2019 7:32 am    
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Erv Niehaus wrote:
Steve,
I read that Gibson moved their acoustic guitar factory to Montana because they felt that Montana had the perfect climate for building acoustic instruments. Very Happy
Erv

So that's what Montana's climate is good for! I've always wondered about that. Razz
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David Mitchell


From:
Tyler, Texas
Post  Posted 16 May 2019 5:38 pm    
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It's extreme drastic temperature changes that wreak havoc on musical instruments. For instance I have found some of my guitars completely soaked in water from bringing an instrument in a case that was in the cold into a warm house. If you do that don't open the case for at least 30 minutes and let the instrument acclimate to it's new environment.
The times I immediately opened the case the air change caused condensation to immediately turn to water on the guitar. If I had not seen it myself I wouldn't have believed it either. Also if an acoustic instrument is flying in the cargo compartment of an airliner ascending about 20,000 ft. like say from a warm Los Angeles to Alaska it can bust a Martin guitar all to pieces. It will look like a kit guitar when you open the case. I guess the glue contracts quicker than the wood and disassembles it. One other thing, I don't leave anything but amplifiers and speakers in a summer hot trailer or bus. Just look at what it does to a vinyl phonograph record and there is some plastic/nylon parts on steels and other instruments. I don't know of any modern pickups that are not either dipped in wax or use plastic covers. I have seen warped pickups from buying and selling used musical instrument for nearly 30 years. Heat is actually a friend to electronics and gasoline engines but extreme heat is not good.
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ajm


From:
Los Angeles
Post  Posted 17 May 2019 6:31 am    
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As for guitars or drums or anything made of wood (except maybe speaker cabinets), the old rule of thumb is: Never leave your guitar anywhere that you wouldn't want to sleep.

A studio outside in a shed in Minnesota?
The trunk or back seat of a locked car during the day in the summer in west Texas?

Of course the exceptions to this rule would be banjos or fiddles. While you're at it, as long as you're frying and baking and freezing them, might as well dunk 'em in some water, too. ;>))

As for the computers, the severe cold may not hurt them but why chance it?
Lots of guys probably have radios and TVs in their garages and it doesn't affect them.
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