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Post new topic difficulty soldering to base plate
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Author Topic:  difficulty soldering to base plate
Steven Welborn


From:
Ojai,CA USA
Post  Posted 21 Oct 2018 3:24 pm    
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I had a hell of a time de-soldering the ground wire from the thick base plates of two trapezoid pickups to send off for rebuilding. I'm ready to solder back up now and anticipate the same. Any tips to make it smooth going?
I'm thinking forget the old solder pool detached from, and clean a new area, preheat and melt a small pool of new solder first, then re-melt and attach wire. I have a Hako solder gun with max 750 degree setting and an old Weller gun 240/325w. I should proably use a broad tip for the Hako.
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Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 21 Oct 2018 6:44 pm    
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First, make sure the tip is clean and tight! To transfer heat effectively, you need a lot of contact area. Rather than just using the very tip of the Weller, hold it so the side or top of the tip element is against the plate, and apply some new solder to aid in heat transfer. Getting the plate warm first, with a heat-gun or hair dryer will help too.

Use 63/37 or 60/40 tin-lead solder, as some of the lead-free types require a lot more heat.
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Jim Sliff


From:
Lawndale California, USA
Post  Posted 21 Oct 2018 6:52 pm    
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DON'T USE A SOLDERING GUN!

Only use a soldering iron on guitar pickups. A gun has a big coil of wire inside that can weaken or demagnetize a pickup.

For ground soldering on baseplates and chassis I use a 100-watt, fixed-temp iron with a chisel tip.

Ypu might get lucky and not damage the pickup with a gun but I've seen it happen countless times.

Soldering guns are NOT appropriate guitar/amp tools. I don't know of a single tech who even keeps one in the shop.
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Godfrey Arthur


From:
Philippines
Post  Posted 22 Oct 2018 4:05 am    
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Jim Sliff wrote:
baseplates and chassis I use a 100-watt, fixed-temp iron with a chisel tip.



I'll second the motion on the 100 watt fixed temp iron. The solder on the plate must be hard and needs something real hot to melt.

I was rebuilding my '63 Jazzmaster and needed a 100 watt iron to solder the ground wire to the brass plates. It was the only way to get enough heat to the plate and melt the solder.

Didn't take long as well.


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Steven Welborn


From:
Ojai,CA USA
Post  Posted 22 Oct 2018 6:39 am    
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wow, I hope I didn't somewhat de-mag those traps when trying to de-solder with the gun. Just had a re-mag done prior too. If the traps were re-charged when rebuilt by Tom Brantley then it's not an issue. Hope that's the case. I'm ordering that 100w fixed temp iron.
Thanks for the valuable tip
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Jim Kennedy


From:
Brentwood California, USA
Post  Posted 22 Oct 2018 9:24 am    
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Definitely use something like the 100 watt Iron with a chisel tip. You need the heat because it is being drawn off by the size of the piece you are soldering. Heating quickly without overheating is the key. Soldering back to the same spot will probably be easier than soldering to a different location. The area is already "tinned," the solder on that spot is already adhering to the metal. Tin your wire and have a small drop of solder on the iron. That will help the heat to transfer into your piece a little more quickly. With everything tinned you only need to heat the solder to melting to make a good connection. Remove the heat as soon as the solder flows freely. If you have trouble getting things to adhere properly, a little flux will usually do the trick.
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Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post  Posted 22 Oct 2018 2:05 pm    
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Jim Sliff wrote:
DON'T USE A SOLDERING GUN!

Only use a soldering iron on guitar pickups. A gun has a big coil of wire inside that can weaken or demagnetize a pickup...



Jim is right to mention that! (I do tend to forget that many modern techs know nothing about how to properly use soldering guns.) Yes, you should keep the transformer part of the gun (the big thing at the top of the handle) away from the magnets. The magnetic flux at the tip of the gun, however, is extremely weak, and no damage will occur as long as you use the gun properly.
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Peter Harris


From:
South Australia, Australia
Post  Posted 23 Oct 2018 2:45 am    
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...and pre-tinning with paste solder is a LOT easier too.... Cool
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Godfrey Arthur


From:
Philippines
Post  Posted 23 Oct 2018 5:11 am    
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With so many smart irons out, for delicate electronics work, an old large gun is overkill, heavy and hot to hold.


But you do need several irons for different type jobs.
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