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Post new topic room temp
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Author Topic:  room temp
Wayne Harris


From:
Kentucky, USA
Post Posted 29 Nov 2017 6:14 am     Reply with quote

does anyone know whats the lowest temperature can be in a room for a pedal steel guitar that it wouldnt hurt the guitar thanks
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John McClung


From:
Olympia WA, USA
Post Posted 29 Nov 2017 9:44 am     Reply with quote

I've been wondering the same thing, Wayne. Does cold hurt a steel's condition or wood body integrity? How about air moisture? What do you steel techs say about how to properly store pedal steels?
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Erv Niehaus


From:
Litchfield, MN, USA
Post Posted 29 Nov 2017 10:30 am     Reply with quote

Up here on the tundra, you have to be careful when you take a lacquered guitar in from the cold or the finish will crack. It's best to leave it in the case for a while.
I remember it said that if Buddy Emmons would take a guitar in from the cold he would use a hair dryer to warm up the mechanism. Very Happy
Erv
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Lane Gray


From:
Topeka, KS
Post Posted 29 Nov 2017 3:41 pm     Reply with quote

Zero Fahrenheit is no problem.
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2 pedal steels, a lapStrat, and an 8-string Dobro (and 3 ukes)
More amps than guitars, and not many effects
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Clyde Mattocks


From:
Kinston, North Carolina, USA
Post Posted 29 Nov 2017 8:46 pm     Reply with quote

I have left an Emmons LeGrande formica guitar in a band truck for months where the outside temp ranged from 0 to 105 with no ill effects. I wouldn't do that with a lacquer guitar.
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Tony Prior


From:
Charlotte NC..
Post Posted 30 Nov 2017 7:04 am     Reply with quote

I lived and worked in New England for years Ct, Ma, RI , no issues. All gear would stay in the cars overnight while we slept cozy warm in the Hotel rooms !

At home in Ct, over the Thursday thru Sun night periods, the Steel and amps stayed in the car , sometimes it was in the garage, other times not.

New England winters are not to be confused with warm moderate temperatures.

never had an issue.

Laughing
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Bob Hoffnar


From:
Austin, Tx
Post Posted 30 Nov 2017 7:18 am     Reply with quote

I never had a problem with frozen or baked steels. Once the temperature evens out you tune it and play. Lots of working steels live in trailers and cargo bins that bake or freeze everyday depending on the season and location. Been like that forever. It is not a problem.
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http://liminalsoundseries.com/
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George McLellan


From:
Duluth, MN/Mesa, AZ USA
Post Posted 30 Nov 2017 11:12 am     Me too Reply with quote

I have been wondering the same thing about amps and guitars. It sure would be a lot more convenient if I could leave one of mine in Arizona. I would never leave any of mine any place where subject to the cold here in northern Minnesota in the winter, ie: garage,car.
Geo
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Len Amaral


From:
Rehoboth,MA 02769
Post Posted 30 Nov 2017 12:14 pm     Reply with quote

Erv is correct about lacquered finishes. Polyfinishes are more forgiving. Also, a note about chemical reactions with lacquer. Do not leave one of those Snark type tuners on the peghead of your favorite Martin or Gibson. The rubber pads on the tuner will eat into the finish. Sadly, been there and done that:(
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John McClung


From:
Olympia WA, USA
Post Posted 4 Dec 2017 3:14 pm     Reply with quote

Great tip, Len, thanks for pointing that out!
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Mullen pre-RP D-12 9+10 /Li'l Izzy / Stereo Steel combo amp-preamp / JBL, BW & Telonics speakers in Telonics cabinets / Hilton and Telonics volume pedals / BJS bars / George L strings & cables / StealSeat.com pack-a-seat / Macintosh computers / This Space for Hire / Burma Shave
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Kevin Fix


From:
Michigan, USA
Post Posted 4 Dec 2017 7:11 pm     Room Temp Here Reply with quote

I have never left my PSG out in the cold. When staying at Motels I always bring my guitar in with me. I was always scared of temp changes and cracked finishes or a guitar body splitting from temp changes. That's just me. Any of my electronic equipment always comes in for sure also. Condensation and electronics I know don't get along.
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Kevin Fix


From:
Michigan, USA
Post Posted 4 Dec 2017 7:14 pm     Room Temp Reply with quote

I flew to Ireland a few years ago. I was thinking about the temps down below in the cargo area. I almost bought a seat for it!!!!!
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Per Berner


From:
Skövde, Sweden
Post Posted 5 Dec 2017 4:45 am     Reply with quote

I kept a pedal steel in an unheated spare room last winter, where temperatures dropped to around 50 °F/10 °C on the coldest days.

One day I took it out to play in normal room temperature – all the knee levers were "sticky" and wouldn't return properly, and neither did the pedals.

Obviously a matter of different rates of thermal expansion/contraction between the wood cabinet, the aluminium rails and the steel cross shafts – it was back to normal after another day at 68 °F/20 °C. And no effect on the lacquer finish.
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Rick Barnhart


From:
Arizona, USA
Post Posted 5 Dec 2017 4:54 am     Reply with quote

The title "room temp" immediately made me think of something dead. I guess the retired LEO in me makes my thinker function a little differently than normal folks.
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Gibson Hartwell


From:
Missoula, Montana, USA
Post Posted 5 Dec 2017 1:28 pm     Reply with quote

I've done gigs with temps dipping as low as 20°F and as high as 105°F and while not comfortable for me the guitar did fine once it stabilized. I'm sure that guitar has seen temperature extremes slightly beyond those occasionally when traveling. That particular guitar is a Williams----the finish still looks fantastic and it plays great.
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Jim Sliff


From:
Lawndale California, USA
Post Posted 7 Dec 2017 2:44 pm     Reply with quote

Room temperature is only 1/4 of the equation:

1. Room temperature

2. Relative humidity (of the room)

3. Construction (wood and/or metal - and what type(s).

4. construction specifics (how parts are assembled, finished, thicknesses, etc etc ad nauseum.

Guitars with finished wood surfaces are the most susceptible to damage from BOTH low temperatures AND low humidity - especially if finished in lacquer (of any type - and 90+% of the commonly-available lacquers are acrylic/nitrocellulose blends no matter what the labels state).

That type should be stored in a room kept at a minimum 55 degrees F (60 is better) AND 40% relative humidity. Many multi-instrumentalists (like me) run humidifiers year around (and I live near the beach) to keep the humidity level at a constant 55%. Keeps finishes on valuable vintage instruments from cracking - also the same for newer ones.

And constant humidity (and reasonable temp) helps prevent glue joints from drying out, preventing separation and delamination - including formica delamination from wood surfaces.

I've seen similar delamination from metal surfaces in extreme low humidity conditions. Worth thinking about.

(Yes, I'm a guitar tech)
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Doug Palmer


From:
Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Post Posted 8 Dec 2017 6:58 am     Temps Reply with quote

I don't think the cold or heat hurt the guitar. It is a quick change in temperatures that cause problems. If you let your guitar acclimate slowly before playing it you should have no problems.
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