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Author Topic:  What are your favorite "wrong notes" on albums rel
Dave Zirbel


From:
Sebastopol, CA USA
Post  Posted 7 Aug 2009 4:04 pm    
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They can be your "not so favorite" too! I was listening to an old Traffic cd today. Low Spark, it's very organic and sounds live in the studio. In the song Rainmaker at about 4:10 into the song the bass sounds a half step off to me for one note. Then around 6:20 after the jam starts it sounds like Winwoods finger slipped off the string or the string caught on something.

Don't get me wrong, I love the live human feel of music and really believe in capturing the moment if the magic is happening like on the early Dylan recordings. Thought it might be a fun topic.

Let's hear your favorite "clunker classic."
Have fun!
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Guy Cundell


From:
More idle ramblings from South Australia
Post  Posted 7 Aug 2009 7:59 pm    
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The start of Mel Rhyne's organ solo on "Days of Wine and Roses" from the classic "Boss Guitar" album by Wes Montgomery. I think we have all probably been there. Nice recovery, but.

And what a great album!
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Stephen Silver


From:
Asheville, NC
Post  Posted 7 Aug 2009 8:08 pm    
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Dave, I forget which song, but on the first Rancho Deluxe album, JayDee hits a massive clunker.

First time I heard it made realize that we're all human. I asked Jesse why he had left that in and he just shrugged and said something about it being true to the take.

SS

edit....it was the second steel solo on Tonight I'll be Staying Here with You.
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Last edited by Stephen Silver on 8 Aug 2009 5:34 am; edited 1 time in total
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Peter Dollard

 

Post  Posted 7 Aug 2009 8:48 pm     Steve Young Song Montgomery In The Rain
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This is really a great track actually featuring Buddy Emmons and Mac Gayden(of JJ Cale Fame)playing slide guitar on a six string. When it comes time for Mac to back Steve Young's vocal he hits this horribly loud off tone note but he does it so bravely you wouldn't notice it unless you were a musician. It should have been bleeped out but I think they left it in intentionally. Peter
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Rick Barnhart


From:
Arizona, USA
Post  Posted 7 Aug 2009 9:56 pm    
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It may just be my ears, but it seems to me, the upright bass player on Van Morrison's "Moondance" gets lost a few times. It may just be a jazz thing, but those walkin' bass lines seem to stumble along here and there.
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Barry Blackwood


Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 6:28 am    
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If I recall correctly, doesn't the bass on Buck Owen's 'Act Naturally' end the song on the V? Shocked
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Danny Naccarato


From:
Ft. Worth, Texas
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 7:04 am    
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Uh oh... I think I play that same clunker every time we do that song, with RD.... ha

On the old Buck Owens Ranch videos, Don hits a big ole clam at the very end of one of the songs, can't remember which one. I'll have to find it again. He's standing right next to Buck front and center and the look on both of them is priceless....
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Larry Miller

 

From:
Gladeville,TN.USA
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 7:15 am    
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The whole keyboard part on "Freebird"
The capstan slowdown on "Crimson and Clover"
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Nathan Golub


From:
Durham, NC
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 9:08 am    
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In Dylan's Visions of Johanna he adds an extra two lines to the last verse. The whole band starts pushing into the chorus, then realizes he's still singing the verse. I've always liked that part.

Another favorite of mine is on Sir Douglas Quintet's Mendocino album...I think the song is Wanna Be Your Mama Again...anyway, when it goes to the bridge the first time, Doug Sahm yells out "B7!" in between two lines. I guess that doesn't really count as a mistake because the band all goes to B7, but it's cool that they left that in there.

And if you want to read about every mistake the Beatle's recorded, this is an interesting website-

http://wgo.signal11.org.uk/wgo.htm
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Scott Shipley


From:
The Ozark Mountains
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 9:20 am    
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That V on the end of the Buck song is beautiful! There's also a chair squeak at the end of "Love's Gonna Live Here Again." I think that's the song. Raw and wonderful. You can't really hear it on the original vinyl, just the digital remaster.

Which Tammy Wynette song is it that the tape speeds up at the end? It's noticable. "Till I Can Make It On My Own" maybe?
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Larry Miller

 

From:
Gladeville,TN.USA
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 11:26 am    
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Quote:
Which Tammy Wynette song is it that the tape speeds up at the end? It's noticable. "Till I Can Make It On My Own" maybe?
Hi Scott, I think it's "Good Lovin Makes it Right"
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Peter Freiberger

 

From:
California, USA
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 12:40 pm    
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On Stevie Wonder's version of "We Can Work It Out" the bass player, presumably James Jamerson (could also be Bob Babbitt, who played on "Signed Sealed & Delivered"), stops playing in the fade, then picks up again. Still a great cut on a great album.

Since I hadn't noticed it before, I re-listened to that Rancho Deluxe cut and "massive clunker" might be a bit of an overstatement, but I think it's more than worth it for the high caliber of playing throughout the CD. Highly recommended for fans of JayDee.
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Andy Sandoval


From:
Bakersfield, California, USA
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 1:50 pm    
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Danny, the Buck Owens video your thinkin of is "we were made for each other".
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Leslie Ehrlich


From:
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Post  Posted 8 Aug 2009 10:58 pm    
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Deep Purple's 'Made In Japan' album. Ritchie Blackmore accidentally hits the wrong strings while he's playing the riff to 'Smoke On The Water'.
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Joachim Kettner


From:
Germany
Post  Posted 9 Aug 2009 1:28 am    
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Tony Gilkyson- Goodbye Guitar album, a song called Donut and a dream. Allthough I think the steel is very good from the idea perspective, it really is off- pitch. I wondered if they left it in uncorrected on purpose? Winking
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Craig A Davidson


From:
Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin USA
Post  Posted 9 Aug 2009 7:10 am    
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On the live version of Fightin' Side Of Me, when the song goes to the V after the key change, Roy plays the lick in the original key, remembers the change and quick adds the last note to make it sound like nothing happened.
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Bill Cunningham


From:
Atlanta, Ga. USA
Post  Posted 9 Aug 2009 7:18 am    
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Not exactly a wrong note, but have you ever noticed how on the Emmons Live '77 CD, it takes the rhythm section about a measure and a half to sync in on the straight eight groove? Besides the fact that Buddy is Buddy, that feel that made the arrangement very fresh (IMO). I wonder which way they had rehearsed it.

Embarassed Laughing Edited to add that the tune I was referring to was "Mansion On The Hill." I am pretty sure Hank didn't do that way.
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Last edited by Bill Cunningham on 9 Aug 2009 7:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Stu Schulman


From:
Ulster Park New Yawk
Post  Posted 9 Aug 2009 4:08 pm    
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My Favorite is Percy Sledge's When A Man Loves A Woman,In the repeat chorus at the end of the song one of the trumpets cracks and it's still so soulful....gotta love it. Winking
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Clete Ritta


From:
San Antonio, Texas
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 12:49 am    
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Though not a necessarily a specific clunker, Al Kooper's organ track on Dylans "Like A Rolling Stone". He bravely found his way onto the track and "felt" his part about an eigth note later than the rest of the group. Dylan loved the "feel" though, and asked the producer to give it more prominence in the final mix. Clunkers can be the right note at the wrong time too, but some of my favorite players are those with that outside timing which lends itself extremely well in the jazz genre. Mike Stern has that "feel" in spades.
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Olli Haavisto


From:
Jarvenpaa,Finland
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 7:38 am    
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51bsCRv6kI0
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Earnest Bovine


From:
Los Angeles CA USA
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 8:58 am    
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Olli Haavisto wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51bsCRv6kI0


I see now where Brüno got his wig.
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Ellis Miller

 

From:
Cortez, Colorado, USA
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 9:13 am    
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I am a big Johnny Cash fan, especially of the early stuff on Sun Records. If I played some of those intros and solos, some of the notes would have been considered "wrong". When Luther Perkins plays them they are genius in simplicity.
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Guy Cundell


From:
More idle ramblings from South Australia
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 3:33 pm    
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a clam or just another shade of blue? The "wrong note" theory dismantled by an expert.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5bQ0AG8kvc
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Chris LeDrew


From:
Canada
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 3:52 pm    
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Bass mistake at the beginning of the last verse of Rod Stewart's "Maggie May".

The incredibly out of tune electric on the solo/breakdown on Bowie's "Young Americans".

The crazy meter change (slowdown) in the first verse of the Beatles' "I Call Your Name".

Multiple bass fool-ups in The Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again" (although really cool).

The whole Desire album.

Meter sway in the first part of "Beast of Burden", although Charlie makes it sound like he's playing behind the beat.

More to come as I think of them.
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Glen Derksen


From:
Alberta, Canada
Post  Posted 10 Aug 2009 5:36 pm    
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At the beginning of the third line in the second verse of Judy Collin's 'Someday Soon", the bass player hit a flat note and quickly got back on track. Maybe the rest of the take was so good that they decided to go with it.

On Buck Owens And The Buckaroo's 'Live At The White house album", Buddy Alan sang 'Gentle On My Mind'.
At the end of the second verse and into about 4 lines of the third verse, Doyle Holly's bass playing really went South before he regained it for the rest of the song.

When Elvis Presley was recording the song 'Too Much", there was one take where Scotty Moore played a jazzy sounding guitar solo, which according to Moore was an unintentional botched solo. As Elvis and the boy's were listening to the playbacks, deciding which take to go with, the one with the "botched" solo came up. As the solo was playing, Elvis looked at Scotty with a pleased grin, to which Scotty retorted, "you @$$hole!" That was the take that was released.
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