INSTRUCTION STRINGS ACCESSORIES MUSIC LINKS
 Visit Our Catalog at SteelGuitarShopper.com for Steel Guitars, Strings, Instruction, Music and Accessories 
Forum Index
where steel players meet online
The Steel Guitar Forum

Post new topic Steel, is it getting pushed out???
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Reply to topic
Author Topic:  Steel, is it getting pushed out???
Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 11:51 am     Reply with quote

Bo Borland wrote:
Everywhere I play someone always says they are glad there is a pedal steel in the band and at least 6 bands in this area have a steel player.


Bo, I think that's fabulous! I can assure you things ain't like that around Baltimore.

Quote:


I found it most interesting that last year a road show of Always Patsy Cline played a long run and used a "utility " player to do the show. The entire band was 2 guys.

In prior years, a local version of the show used a synth to "approximate" the sound. They did offer me the gig but my schedule didn't make that possible. The sucked too but I wanted to do it anyway.

I have seen the show a couple times (not that version) and pedal steel was an important part of the sound and I would have been disappointed if I had purchased a ticket.


Two guys, huh? Last of the big spenders.

Look, Patsy had a fabulous voice and a great sound (which was often termed "Country-politan", a euphemism for "schmaltzy pop with a tinge of country guitar"). But to my memory, the pedal steel was never significant in any of her records. Aside from "Walkin' After Midnight", which was non-pedal, Don Helms stuff, I'd be hard pressed to think of any of her stuff as actually requiring a pedal steel.

But maybe it's just me.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Herb Steiner


From:
Spicewood TX 78669
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 12:00 pm     Reply with quote

Her recordings were very sparse with the steel playing lead, other than what you mentioned. But Walter Haynes, Ben Keith and (I think) Jimmy Day all recorded with her as backup.

She was produced by Owen Bradley, was she not? And he was well known for de-countrifying the music in those days, as was Chet Atkins for that matter.
_________________
Herb's Steel Guitar Pages
Texas Steel Guitar Association
Allison String Instruments
My rig: Infinity and Telonics.

Son, we live in a world with walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with steel guitars. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinberg?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Roger Rettig


From:
An Englishman in Naples, FL
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 12:13 pm     Reply with quote

I have done over thirty different productions of 'Always, Patsy...' and, after having studied her material in preparation for the first one I did (1998 in Roanoke, VA), I was surprised to learn that steel guitar played such a subordinate role. But, as others have noted, Owen Bradley (along with Chet) was fighting a rearguard action in Nashville and trying to beat rock and roll - this was late '50s/early '60s - at its own game. Their instincts told them to replace steel and fiddles with some electric guitar and some 12/8 piano fills.

In any case, 'APC' took shape in the mind of Ted Swindley who assumed that fiddle and steel were a 'must have' for a country band and, I'm happy to say, his historical research was sketchy at best. As a result I, and a bunch of other players, have had some steady income. You can be sure that, when he was anywhere around, I was careful not to correct him in case he did a rewrite!
_________________
RR
Emmons LG3 D-10, JCH SD-10, Zum Encore


-------------------------
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Bo Borland


From:
South Jersey -
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 12:38 pm     Reply with quote

Yes it is true the actual recording of Patsy were stingy on pedal steel but in the versions of the show that I saw the pedal steel was a prominent part of the band.

The last version I saw was in Lewes Delaware with a forum member, whose name escapes me, playing a 12 string Uni . I believe he is also a Floridian.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Herb Steiner


From:
Spicewood TX 78669
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 1:32 pm     Reply with quote

Roger Rettig wrote:


In any case, 'APC' took shape in the mind of Ted Swindley who assumed that fiddle and steel were a 'must have' for a country band and, I'm happy to say, his historical research was sketchy at best. As a result I, and a bunch of other players, have had some steady income. You can be sure that, when he was anywhere around, I was careful not to correct him in case he did a rewrite!


During rehearsals of my first run at "APC" back in 1995-96, Ted Swindley came over from Houston to oversee direction, and was quite demanding with the actors, not so much the band, but yet very fair and very amusingly flamboyant. Wink He also brought the real Louise Seger to meet the cast and that was very nice as well.
_________________
Herb's Steel Guitar Pages
Texas Steel Guitar Association
Allison String Instruments
My rig: Infinity and Telonics.

Son, we live in a world with walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with steel guitars. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinberg?
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Barry Blackwood


Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 1:37 pm     Reply with quote

Quote:
Yes it is true the actual recording of Patsy were stingy on pedal steel but in the versions of the show that I saw the pedal steel was a prominent part of the band.

I would have been highly disappointed if I went to see the show and this was the case. Pedal steel was not her sound. Oh Well
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Roger Rettig


From:
An Englishman in Naples, FL
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 1:43 pm     Reply with quote

Ted mystified us all one day at rehearsal when he was critiquing our performance of one of the songs. He stood there assuming a thespian-like pose and slowly intoned....

"It needs to sound more...... orange."

Needless to say, and once he'd left, it became one of our favourite catch-phrases. I'm still not sure what he meant.
_________________
RR
Emmons LG3 D-10, JCH SD-10, Zum Encore


-------------------------
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Herb Steiner


From:
Spicewood TX 78669
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 1:46 pm     Reply with quote

Barry Blackwood wrote:
Quote:
Yes it is true the actual recording of Patsy were stingy on pedal steel but in the versions of the show that I saw the pedal steel was a prominent part of the band.

I would have been highly disappointed if I went to see the show and this was the case. Pedal steel was not her sound. Oh Well


Not her recorded sound, for sure. But those were only her recordings; I've talked to guys who knew her and played with her, and she was a down home country girl who could tell a dirty joke with the best of them and party down with the musicians. She played shows backed by many a honky tonk band, and that's what the plot of APC is all about.

She was a good pal of Buddy Charlton, who she played with in VA, and I understand she recommended him to Ernest Tubb when Emmons wanted to leave the band to play with Price.
_________________
Herb's Steel Guitar Pages
Texas Steel Guitar Association
Allison String Instruments
My rig: Infinity and Telonics.

Son, we live in a world with walls, and those walls have to be guarded by men with steel guitars. Who's gonna do it? You? You, Lt. Weinberg?


Last edited by Herb Steiner on 16 Feb 2017 1:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Fred Justice


From:
Mesa, Arizona
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 1:48 pm     Reply with quote

Only one person is needed to keep steel guitar alive in the world and in your heart, and that person is YOURSELF. Very Happy
_________________
Email: fredjustice@justicesteelguitars.com
Webesite: www.justicesteelguitars.com
Phone: 480-986-2599
Justice Steel Guitars and Accessories~Hilton Pedals~S.I.T. Strings
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Neil Lang


From:
Albert Lea, Minnesota, USA
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 2:17 pm     Reply with quote

It is very, very sad to see our beloved instrument in such decline in the last several years. As I see it, it also had a relatively "short" life span (as instruments go) where it was so hot in Country Music. Pretty much late 50's through the 60's & 70's then starting to decline alot through the 80's until now. Really only good and strong for about 20-25 years. Don't get me wrong, it was, and still is around, but not near as much.
They say "what goes around comes around" lets pray it starts a renewed life cycle soon. For now....I'll live in the past!! Very Happy
_________________
Sho-Bud Steel Guitars, 3 Super Pro's, 1 Super Pro II (Rose) & 1 Finger Tip
Fender Guitars & Basses
Peavey Amps & Sound Equipment
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Damir Besic


From:
Nashville,TN.
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 4:48 pm     Reply with quote

10 years from now pedal steel will be as often on the records or radio, as dulcimer is today....
_________________
www.steelguitarsonline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
David Mason


From:
Cambridge, MD, USA
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 8:13 pm     Reply with quote

Old country music is going away, along with the players who play it and the listeners who like it. However, there is more steel being recorded and played now than maybe anytime in history. Ask the people who make and sell steel guitars, there are more of them than ever and the best ones have a very long waiting list. The 2008 bank robbery affected everything creative, but certainly NOT steel disproportionately.

If you don't want to listen to the music that now has steel guitar in it, that's fine. But steel guitar is alive and thriving, the country music of 1950 to 1985 isn't. The jazz scene, the Scandanavians are doing wonders, the art music (Susan Alcorn - I never know what to call it?) Here are over a hundred steel players playing just about ANY and EVERY kind of music imaginable:
http://bb.steelguitarforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=208507

It will take you many days, even a few weeks, to check out just these people and their links. If that's not enough to get you going.... The most important point to see is that if you want to hear the best of modern music TURN OFF YOUR TELEVISION AND TURN OFF YOUR RADIO. And if you'd like any of us posting there to narrow down that HUGE amount to a certain taste, just ASK. We live in a GREAT TIME for music, even too great - there's not a week goes by I don't hear another great band or musician I don't have time for!

TRY and give the people on these links a fair shake, huh? You won't know what it sounds like till you open it up.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Damir Besic


From:
Nashville,TN.
Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 8:23 pm     Reply with quote

Quote:
steel guitar is alive and thriving


I would love to know where all those people buy their guitars, because it sure ain't from me lol
_________________
www.steelguitarsonline.com
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Brian Henry


Post Posted 16 Feb 2017 8:31 pm     Reply with quote

Wherever I go Dobro is alive and well. I have one of those Tom. Bradford dobro converters which gives a real dobro sound to a pedal steel. Since I started using it many doors have opened and many opportunities to gig. Blue grass seems to have always been with us, while country is almost nonexistent.

We need to diversify!
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 5:02 am     Reply with quote

David Mason wrote:
Old country music is going away, along with the players who play it and the listeners who like it. However, there is more steel being recorded and played now than maybe anytime in history. Ask the people who make and sell steel guitars, there are more of them than ever and the best ones have a very long waiting list. The 2008 bank robbery affected everything creative, but certainly NOT steel disproportionately.



Well, I see it differently. Yes, there are lots of builders now, but they're really not making many guitars. In it's heyday, MSA made and sold probably over twice as many guitars per year than all the builders we have now...combined! The "big guns", those few builders who made thousands of guitars (Fender, MSA, Sho~Bud, and Emmons) are pretty much gone.

Yes, there is still a lot of stuff being recorded, both vanity and indie stuff, but sales and exposure are low. There's lotsa basement studios, garage-band type stuff, and mostly unknown singers and players serving very small audiences, and likely making very little money. (Robert Randolph would probably be the sole exception.)

With all the thousands and thousands of instruments out there (Don't we all know people with a half-dozen or so guitars?), and the incredible amount of online resources (that we never had back in the day), there are still remarkably few players working or recording.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tony Prior


From:
Charlotte NC..
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 5:52 am     Reply with quote

Johnny it's a valid concern of course, but on the other hand is show and travel costs. Many things are spiraling out of control these days.

Can a show go on without a Steel ? Sure, Should it ? I say no.

Keyboard players have the same issue, probably the same complaint.

Locally,( Charlotte Nc) small potatoes, where I live, Steel players are working. This isn't even considered a Country Music town , but we are working steady , many of us. Are we getting rich ? NO. Are we making expenses, probably just barely , but this is a local market not a touring market.

On another note, as you mentioned, those of us who play other instruments and perhaps front a few vocals now and then are indeed busy all the time. The gigs I play 4 to 6 /month, I am easily on Steel 75 % of the time, maybe more and then Guitar ( lead or rhythm) and some vocals the rest of the time.

If I was a touring pro player I suspect I would be required to do several things, and I have, when I toured regionally they wanted me to do it all. And I did, Steel, Telecaster and vocals, ONE pay check !

Maybe it's time to just seek out a local gig with some local players and just relax in your craft ! If you are looking to earn a few hundred per gig, that may be difficult. Only you can decide if you want to play for the LOVE of the instrument or the paycheck. That doesn't mean play for free. As we get older, me certainly included, there are plenty of places for us to play with other musicians and give something back. Seniors, the VA., weekly dances etc...

I am no longer participating with any artists or bands that think they are gonna be the next Jones or Haggard, I do sit in with them now and then but thats not my target, never was. I play small 2 hour shows twice a month and a few weekly dances , I am not stagnant, I am still improving and I am having lots of fun.


Wish I had a better answer !
_________________
<b>Steel Guitar music here >>> http://www.tprior.com/five.htm</b>

Emmons Steels, Fender Telecasters
Pro Tools 8 and Pro Tools 12
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Roger Rettig


From:
An Englishman in Naples, FL
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 6:28 am     Reply with quote

I'm sure it's particularly irksome for a player of Johnny's level. He's worked hard at his craft and is unquestionably one of the best I've ever heard. I recall sitting watching him with the Time Jumpers many, many years ago when he was playing his triple-neck Zum.

I also remember a similar conversation with the late, great Herbie Wallace. There he was in Sevierville at a time (late-'90s) when there were still a bunch of gigs in that town and he was dismayed that he couldn't get a job because steel was all he played. And that was Herbie who was another master-player.

Things can only have got worse since then.
_________________
RR
Emmons LG3 D-10, JCH SD-10, Zum Encore


-------------------------
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jack Stoner


From:
Inverness, Fl
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 7:23 am     Reply with quote

I got the impression when Johnny moved back Nashville it was going to be back in his comfort zone, but it appears the opposite. Nashville is not like it was when he left.

If I were a "mature" musician looking for a place to roost, it would not be Nashville. I don't know what area would be a better option (if there even is one). Nashville now is catering to the 20 somethings and just about all the bands seem to have similar age group pickers.

I used to get a lot of jobs, here in Florida in the Winter, with "older" Nashville singers. That is almost dried up, although admittedly there aren't many "older" Nashville singers around anymore.
_________________
Franklin D-10, Hilton VP, POD X3, MatchBro, Carvin BX500, EPS-15C, TT-12, Sonar Platinum DAW, MOTU 896mk3 Hybrid
R.O.P.E. Member
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tom Quinn


Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 2:35 pm     Reply with quote

Youngsters in the '60s hated accordion because to them it sounded too cheesy and came with the hated polka music that was prevalent among their elders -- talking Cleveland Ohio here.

I don't think anyone hates the pedal steel like accordions were despised. But pedal steels are heavy, expensive and difficult to master. So that leaves a lot lacking for the .com generation.

I'm sure it will indeed come back and I think most folks genuinely like the sound of the instrument. Traditional Cajun music -- I also play the Cajun 10-button melodeon -- has at most maybe 50 songs total in the repertoire. Yet it is alive and doing very well indeed. People around the country love it and to dance to it. I think traditional C&W will survive if it is three chords and the truth.
_________________
If you succeed in cheating someone, don't think that the person is a fool. It's just that the person trusted you far more than you deserved.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tony Prior


From:
Charlotte NC..
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 3:28 pm     Reply with quote

Tom Quinn wrote:
Youngsters in the '60s hated accordion because to them it sounded too cheesy and came with the hated polka music that was prevalent among their elders --


hey them's fightin' words ! My first Instrument was an Accordion ! My father played Accordion, all the Polkas I'm sure...I wanted a guitar so he gave me an Accordion... Sad

I did learn to play though, it was cheesy music for certain ! Smile
_________________
<b>Steel Guitar music here >>> http://www.tprior.com/five.htm</b>

Emmons Steels, Fender Telecasters
Pro Tools 8 and Pro Tools 12
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Brett Day


From:
Pickens, SC
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 3:29 pm     Reply with quote

I never will forget a quote my friend and one of my favorite country artists, Danni Leigh had posted on Facebook. She said, "We need to hear more steel guitar and not less-she loves the steel too. I agree with Danni-we do need to see and hear more steel! So, at that very moment, I commented on the status, telling Danni that I'm a steel player and as soon as I told her I'm a steel player, she got excited! A few years ago, I was reading where the band Ricochet had changed several members after Shannon Farmer, who replaced Teddy Carr left, and I thought to myself, "I can't hear "Daddy's Money", "What Do I Know", "Love Is Stronger Than Pride, and "Ease My Troubled Mind" without steel. Then, a few years later, I talked on Facebook with Ricochet lead singer/guitarist Heath Wright and they added a steel player named Larry Hight, who plays a Carter SD-10.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger
Storm Rosson


From:
Silver City, NM. USA
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 4:03 pm     Reply with quote

Just from what I hear on the tube and from a few old buds , I think Austin may be the current and I hope not the last holdout for decent music.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Bill Miller


From:
Gaspe, Quebec, Canada
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 5:33 pm     Reply with quote

I don't see the problem as steel being pushed out as much as classic country being abandoned. Most people who still love the music still love pedal steel, but it's a tough sell in today's world. Will it come back? The heyday is over but there will be always be some interest in certain local markets. There are classic country lovers in many different countries. I see artists from Ireland, Scandinavia, France and French speaking areas of Canada doing great country and featuring pedal steel. Check out Caitlin Murtagh from Ireland for one.
Damir, I don't think there have ever been as many dulcimer lovers as pedal steel lovers. Let's face it, a steel guitar in the right hands is an incredibly beautiful and expressive instrument. Just my opinion but I think it's too beautiful to ever fade away entirely. When's the last time a dulcimer player made the hair stand up on your arms? Very Happy
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Kevin Hatton


From:
Buffalo, N.Y.
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 7:09 pm     Reply with quote

What Donny Hinson said about a lazy push button society is brilliant. The benefit/rewards for young people to play pedal steel are not there like they were for the prior generations. Very smart analysis. Where are the country balladeers? That's who we need more of.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Jack Strayhorn


From:
Winston-Salem, NC
Post Posted 17 Feb 2017 8:17 pm     Reply with quote

For years steel players were scarce as hens teeth in my neck of the woods. Currently, most club bands now have a steel. Don't know where these players are coming from but glad they're here.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website

All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Jump to:  

Our Online Catalog
Strings, CDs, instruction,
steel guitars & accessories

www.SteelGuitarShopper.com

Steel Guitar Music
Instrumental steel guitar CDs for your permanent collection
www.SteelGuitarMusic.com

Please review our Forum Rules and Policies

The Steel Guitar Forum
148 South Cloverdale Blvd.
Cloverdale, CA 95425 USA

Support This Forum


BIAB Styles
Ray Price Shuffles for Band-in-a-Box
by Jim Baron
HTTP