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Author Topic:  Anyone have problems with Loud drummers?
Greg Lambert


From:
Illinois, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 9:52 am     Reply with quote

I have played with quite a few bands in my lifetime and one of the most annoying thing I can think of is a drummer that that beats his drums as loud and hard as they can.

I have played at several Steel guitar conventions and these drummers dont do that , They play with the band not above them.
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Roger Crawford


From:
McDonough, GA USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 10:13 am     Reply with quote

Greg,
The drummers at steel guitar shows are musicians, not just drummers. There is a difference. It's playing "with" the band and playing what the music calls for that makes the difference. Another of my pet peeve with drummers is the train wreck at the end of a song. It's like, "you didn't hear enough drums in the song, so here is a little extra for you". When the song is over, it's over.
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Pete Burak


From:
Portland, OR USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 10:30 am     Reply with quote

Have him switch to brushes.
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Curry Coster


From:
Glen Burnie, MD USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 11:43 am     Reply with quote

Who doesn't?
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Paul Sutherland


From:
Placerville, California
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 1:13 pm     Reply with quote

Sometimes the only solution, besides leaving the band, is ear plugs. I HATE drummers that crash cymbals all night long.
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Dave Meis


From:
Washington, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 1:44 pm     Reply with quote

Seems harder for steel players, as we're sitting at 'eye level' to the cymbals.. the cats on the front line are above it and don't notice, so it's hard to get any sympathy! Smile If I have trouble with a drummer, I only have it once...I already have tinnitus from 45 years in machine shops. I'm not giving up anymore hearing. Smile
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Henry Matthews


From:
Texarkana, Ark USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 1:46 pm     Reply with quote

Another thing you all may or may not know, It's very possible for the drummer to have a ride cymbal that's either out of tune or makes other things sound out of tune. Don't know the reason behind it but our drummer was a big ride cymbal guy and I noticed every time he was playing it, the tuning went to pot. We finally figured out what it was and he changed cymbals and everything was ok then. Confused Confused
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Mike Perlowin


From:
Los Angeles CA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 2:47 pm     Reply with quote

One of our members here has a pretty good rock band, but the last time I saw them, the drummer played so loud that the other guys had to crank up the amps in order to hear themselves, and the total volume was past the point pf pain. I had to leave because it all so loud.
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Bill Miller


From:
Gaspe, Quebec, Canada
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 4:57 pm     Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure someone posted on here at some point it takes an awfully good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. There's a lot of truth in that.
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Greg Lambert


From:
Illinois, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 5:17 pm     Reply with quote

Roger Crawford wrote:
Greg,
The drummers at steel guitar shows are musicians, not just drummers. There is a difference. It's playing "with" the band and playing what the music calls for that makes the difference. Another of my pet peeve with drummers is the train wreck at the end of a song. It's like, "you didn't hear enough drums in the song, so here is a little extra for you". When the song is over, it's over.


You must have been to some of my gigs..lol. Your right every song has to end with two measures added at 120db
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Doug Palmer


From:
Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 5:23 pm     Drummer's Reply with quote

Most drummers are not musicians! Most have damaged their ears and don't hear the cymbal overtones and can't tune their drums to whole tones. I always have a set of earplugs in my seat for that reason. It is no fun playing like that and I try to avoid the noise bands.
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Brooks Montgomery


From:
Idaho, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 5:38 pm     Reply with quote

Bill Miller wrote:
I'm pretty sure someone posted on here at some point it takes an awfully good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. There's a lot of truth in that.


...but then if you have a drum machine, you're pretty darn close to karaoke.
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Dick Wood


From:
Springtown Texas, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:08 pm     Reply with quote

I've noticed that the best drummers I have ever played with bring a basic kit. Two cymbals,kick snare and a ride tom.

I played a recent gig with a 59 year old female who had great timing and used the bare minimum of drums,almost no cymbals and it sounded great.
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Brooks Montgomery


From:
Idaho, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:17 pm     Reply with quote

Dick Wood wrote:
I've noticed that the best drummers I have ever played with bring a basic kit. Two cymbals,kick snare and a ride tom.

I played a recent gig with a 59 year old female who had great timing and used the bare minimum of drums,almost no cymbals and it sounded great.


You just described Travis Hardy, the guy I've been playing with. He was the drummer with a young group Mickey and the Motorcars , Austin TX(on their first two albums). He plays that *exact* set up you described at every gig, but he and his father have something like 100 drum kits in a warehouse in Challis Idaho (they collect and rebuild old kits). Every gig he plays, he picks a kit that is the appropriate size/loudness for the gig, many of his kits are from the 30's and 40's (old slingerlands and such) He's a hell of a singer too. Classic honky-tonk drummer, and a joy to play with.
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Donny Hinson


From:
Glen Burnie, Md. U.S.A.
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:39 pm     Anyone have problems with Loud drummers? Reply with quote

Curry Coster wrote:
Who doesn't?


Uhh...Lawrence Welk? Laughing

Regrettably, the era of tasteful drummers and un-distorted guitars seems to have passed.
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Greg Lambert


From:
Illinois, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:41 pm     Reply with quote

Brooks Montgomery wrote:
Bill Miller wrote:
I'm pretty sure someone posted on here at some point it takes an awfully good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. There's a lot of truth in that.


...but then if you have a drum machine, you're pretty darn close to karaoke.


Depends on how you use them. I have played a lot of places with Band in Box and Lead player and my steel. Other times I have used Boss DR 880 drums and bass with the lead player and my steel. The crowd loved it. Volumes were perfect.
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Greg Lambert


From:
Illinois, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:41 pm     drums Reply with quote

Brooks Montgomery wrote:
Bill Miller wrote:
I'm pretty sure someone posted on here at some point it takes an awfully good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. There's a lot of truth in that.


...but then if you have a drum machine, you're pretty darn close to karaoke.


Depends on how you use them. I have played a lot of places with Band in Box and Lead player and my steel. Other times I have used Boss DR 880 drums and bass with the lead player and my steel. The crowd loved it. Volumes were perfect.
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Brooks Montgomery


From:
Idaho, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 6:56 pm     Re: drums Reply with quote

Greg Lambert wrote:
Brooks Montgomery wrote:
Bill Miller wrote:
I'm pretty sure someone posted on here at some point it takes an awfully good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. There's a lot of truth in that.


...but then if you have a drum machine, you're pretty darn close to karaoke.


Depends on how you use them. I have played a lot of places with Band in Box and Lead player and my steel. Other times I have used Boss DR 880 drums and bass with the lead player and my steel. The crowd loved it. Volumes were perfect.


I've heard some excellent karaoke singers.
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Rich Upright


From:
Florida, USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 7:44 pm     Reply with quote

I like a heavy kick & snare, and almost no cymbal. The drummer in my band fits that perfectly.
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Jerry Roller


From:
Van Buren, Arkansas USA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 10:23 pm     Reply with quote

While a lot of drummers are guilty of playing too loud they are not alone. A loud keyboard or electric guitar banging rhythm instead of pulling back is just as detrimental and I suspect some steel players are guilty. There is much more to being a musician than being able to play an instrument. Our Friday night drummer Clark Cox is a joy to play with. He feels the dynamics of a song and does not cover them up. If we could all learn to do our thing then pretty much bail out how sweet it could be. Sorry, I forgot this was supposed to be about drummers.
Jerry
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Skip Edwards


From:
LA,CA
Post Posted 12 Dec 2016 10:40 pm     Reply with quote

"Dynamics? I'm playing as loud as I can!"

Don't get me started...
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Dave Mudgett


From:
Central Pennsylvania
Post Posted 13 Dec 2016 3:07 am     Reply with quote

Of course, I suspect most anybody playing popular music for any length of time has dealt with an obnoxiously loud drummer - perhaps many. But I'm with Jerry Roller on this. I love playing with a "good" drummer, and what constitutes "good" drumming depends on context and personal preference.

It is a drag (for me) to play with people who don't have a shared ensemble vision. It all too frequently becomes a narcissistic tug-of-war. To me, that is the issue, not drummers, or any specific instrument. I think part of the deal is that drummers have a lot of power in an ensemble. Used wisely, it can be glorious. Used poorly, it can be a mess.
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Jim Pitman


From:
Waterbury Ctr. VT 05677 USA
Post Posted 13 Dec 2016 4:52 am     Reply with quote

I played in a modern country band whereby the band leader always complained to the drummer he wasn't hitting them hard enough. I no longer play in that band.
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Mike Perlowin


From:
Los Angeles CA
Post Posted 13 Dec 2016 6:20 am     Reply with quote

Dave Mudgett wrote:
It all too frequently becomes a narcissistic tug-of-war.


Lead guitarists are often the worst when it comes to that.
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Pete Burak


From:
Portland, OR USA
Post Posted 13 Dec 2016 6:34 am     Reply with quote

I point an Amp right at him (who-ever it is playing too loud) and let it rip til they get the message.
Here's where I got the idea...

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