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Author Topic:  Share-A-Lick
Rich Sullivan


From:
Nelson, NH 03457
Post Posted 24 Nov 2015 6:51 pm     Reply with quote

I thought I would share a couple of licks, and see if anyone else wants to jump in with a favorite lick.

I heard a piano player using this first one, and tried various positions until I found that in this position, it plays easily, even at very fast tempos. As Mike Neer has pointed out, the real magic of a 6th tuning lies in the whole tone (or major second) interval between the five and six tones (or between the G and A strings in C6 tuning), because it creates a sort of pivot point for playing melodies. When I was learning this lick, I also realized that by dropping down one string, the major second interval expands by a half-tone to a minor third. And dropping down one more string expands the interval by another half-tone to a major third. (I knew the string intervals already, but I hadn't put it together that those three string pairs shrink or expand sequentially by a half-tone depending on the direction you move.) Anyway, that is the basis for making this lick work. My idea of the value for a lick like this is to play it in all the keys, and then to mess around with it, changing rhythms, inverting notes, and finding other variations.






The next lick is just a common major blues scale, shown in two positions. Notice the last half of the lick is identical to the ending of the lick shown above. Most players would probably find this lick in the home key position as shown in the last two measures. But the first two measures show the same lick centered around the IV chord position. Learning to play over the I chord, while in the IV chord position, can lead to a major advancement in your playing (IMHO). I hope these two licks give you some new ideas. And that others might also share some of their discoveries.


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Guy Cundell


From:
More idle ramblings from South Australia
Post Posted 24 Nov 2015 10:23 pm     Reply with quote

Great idea for a thread, Rich. I enjoyed your two licks.

My contribution is the opening phrase of Jitterbug Waltz. I've been playing it on 6 string reso for a while and have just started working on it in A6 on 8 string reso. Looks straight forward but keeping the 3/4 meter going without accompaniment can be tricky. Taking off on the 'one and' doesn't help.

Is it a scale or an arpeggio? Strictly speaking it isn't a scale as it is not organised in ascending or descending order. I have seen exercises in the same fashion referred to as 'digitals'.


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Andy Volk


From:
Boston, MA
Post Posted 25 Nov 2015 5:08 am     Reply with quote

Okay, I'll play! Here's one: a chord run using slants that subs a number of chords for the dominant chord in a ii-V-I progression. It works because the sounds are all essentially of the same "flavor." You could leave out the last reverse slant to straight bar A6th-to-A6th as your taste dictates. This run works both in Hawaiian and swing contexts and is movable to all keys. I like it best in an uptempo tune.


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Doug Beaumier


From:
Northampton, MA
Post Posted 25 Nov 2015 8:20 am     Reply with quote

Okay, I'm in. Here's a simple C6 blues lick. It's important to slide into fret 8 to get the right effect. A quick slide, fret 7 --> 8, twice.


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Andy Volk


From:
Boston, MA
Post Posted 27 Nov 2015 6:18 am     Reply with quote

Here's one more. Try this over a static Cmaj7 chord in BIAB. Alternating C-major and D-major triads lends a modern, open sound that's different from that of a scale or playing a Cmaj7 arpeggio. Superimposing triads over chords is a cornerstone of guitarist Larry Carleton's approach.


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Mike Neer


From:
NJ
Post Posted 28 Nov 2015 8:02 am     Reply with quote

Great idea for a thread, Rich!

Here's a little something. These are both based on cool little anomalies in the C6 tuning. Just a closer look at playing around with intervals. Sometimes something doesn't have to make sense harmonically to sound good, so don't be afraid to color outside of the lines.

https://youtu.be/g_WRfWPpytQ



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Rich Sullivan


From:
Nelson, NH 03457
Post Posted 3 Dec 2015 4:54 pm     Reply with quote

I like all of the posts. A really good variety, and some interesting ideas. Thought I would keep this alive by adding a couple more.

The first lick is meant to replicate the ending tag in the Ray Price recording of Heartaches By The Number. Of course that was Jimmy Day on E9 pedal steel. But here it is on non-pedal C6. I play the last dyad as an extreme reverse slant, but you could also approach it as a string pull.



This next lick was often used by Little Roy Wiggins. It is all palm harmonics, and can be used in either a I-IV or a V-I progression. It is a good exercise for keeping the right hand moving in sync with the bar while playing palm harmonics.

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Nic Sanford


From:
Oklahoma
Post Posted 19 Dec 2015 7:16 pm     Reply with quote

Thanks, everyone who shared licks. This is great.
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Jim Fogarty


From:
Phila, Pa, USA
Post Posted 19 Sep 2017 4:25 pm     Reply with quote

Bit of a zombie thread, I know....but good stuff. Maybe folks have more to add now?
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Jim Fogarty


From:
Phila, Pa, USA
Post Posted 19 Sep 2017 5:33 pm     Reply with quote

Here's a GREAT thread by Andy, from the old forum in 2001, with a ton of swing licks.

https://steelguitarforum.com/Forum8/HTML/001019.html
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George Piburn


From:
The Oklahoma Hills, USA
Post Posted 19 Sep 2017 6:00 pm     Pedal Steel Super Lick Translated into C6 Reply with quote

Thank you Rich for starting this thread.

Like everyone else I am inspired by Mick Hearn and others that do pedal sounds on C6.

I took the time to create this solo made popular by Bruce Bouton with Ricky Skaggs back in the 1980's. Thanks to Micky Adams youtube video and a lot of wood shedding.

I do not read music fluently enough to do the fancy transcript with notation -- perhaps someone will do this for everyone.

It is up to the individual to phrase and time this.





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Jim Fogarty


From:
Phila, Pa, USA
Post Posted 19 Sep 2017 6:58 pm     Reply with quote

Figured I should try adding something. Tabbed this out for one of my students.

Commander Cody's Hot Rod Lincoln - main boogie-woogie guitar riff in E for C6 Lap Steel.

Play fast!!


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