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Author Topic:  Understanding PSG Tab
Peter Goodchild


From:
Milton Keynes, United Kingdom
Post Posted 29 Apr 2011 1:07 pm     Reply with quote

Hi all.
How do I interpret PSG tab, what do the symbols mean?
Cheers.
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Elizabeth West


From:
Surrey, B.C., Canada
Post Posted 30 Apr 2011 8:24 am     Reply with quote


Hope this helps.My friend Hank Rodgers gave this to me years age.
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Peter Goodchild


From:
Milton Keynes, United Kingdom
Post Posted 30 Apr 2011 11:16 am     Understanding PSG Tab Reply with quote

Hi thanks,
In the first diagram where three strings are fretted at the 5th fret with the B string fretted at the 5th fret which has an A next to it. Are all three strings plucked with pedal A depressed? Or are all three strings plucked and then the pedal A is pressed to raise the pitch?
Also same questions for the notes next to these with A & B next to them and the ones next to them that have pedal B & C next to the notes.
Thank you.
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Jim Cohen


From:
Philadelphia, PA
Post Posted 30 Apr 2011 11:41 am     Reply with quote

Peter, see comments below:

In the first diagram where three strings are fretted at the 5th fret with the B string fretted at the 5th fret which has an A next to it. Are all three strings plucked with pedal A depressed? Or are all three strings plucked and then the pedal A is pressed to raise the pitch?

All 3 are plucked with the A pedal already engaged. If the writer wishes to have you pluck the string(s) without the pedal first and then engage the pedal afterwards, they will show it as a tied note. For example, in the second line of tab shown, the middle group has the 3 strings plucked at the 5th fret first without any pedal, and then adding in the A&B pedals after plucking. In the right-hand group, you pluck the strings again with the pedals engaged and then let off the pedals.


Also same questions for the notes next to these with A & B next to them and the ones next to them that have pedal B & C next to the notes.

The B&C pedal example (like the rest of the first line) has no going in or out of the pedals. They are engaged at the same time (or sometimes slightly before) you pluck the strings.

Hope that's all clear.
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Peter Goodchild


From:
Milton Keynes, United Kingdom
Post Posted 30 Apr 2011 12:07 pm     Reply with quote

Jim Cohen wrote:
Peter, see comments below:

In the first diagram where three strings are fretted at the 5th fret with the B string fretted at the 5th fret which has an A next to it. Are all three strings plucked with pedal A depressed? Or are all three strings plucked and then the pedal A is pressed to raise the pitch?

All 3 are plucked with the A pedal already engaged. If the writer wishes to have you pluck the string(s) without the pedal first and then engage the pedal afterwards, they will show it as a tied note. For example, in the second line of tab shown, the middle group has the 3 strings plucked at the 5th fret first without any pedal, and then adding in the A&B pedals after plucking. In the right-hand group, you pluck the strings again with the pedals engaged and then let off the pedals.


Also same questions for the notes next to these with A & B next to them and the ones next to them that have pedal B & C next to the notes.

The B&C pedal example (like the rest of the first line) has no going in or out of the pedals. They are engaged at the same time (or sometimes slightly before) you pluck the strings.

Hope that's all clear.

I'm with you, cheers Jim.
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Carl Mesrobian


From:
Salem, Massachusetts, USA
Post Posted 3 Sep 2012 1:09 pm     Reply with quote

How are knee levers shown?? I've seen L or LL on the 2nd string - is that half and whole step flat?
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Jim Cohen


From:
Philadelphia, PA
Post Posted 3 Sep 2012 4:29 pm     Reply with quote

Different people show the knee levers in a few different ways, but if you've seen the second string on an E9 copedent shown as L or LL then, yes, that would mean 1/2 lower or whole step lower.
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Beverly Harris


From:
Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, USA
Post Posted 21 Mar 2014 5:29 am     Knee levers Reply with quote

After you learn some of these markings, you may find different ones such as: LKL meaning Left Knee Left, RKR right knee right….
The deal is that some guitars are set up differently than others. Just try yours to see what they do and compare it to the artist's tablature. My LKL raises the 8th and 4th string. My LKR lowers the 8th and 4th string. My RKL has a stop so that I can create a minor chord within the key fret. For example, if I'm in the 8th fret, no pedals, (C major), I can use my RKL stop (1/2 of the way in) to create C minor. That is not the original set up on the guitar.

Some people also name the levers differently D, E, F,… Some pedals are in reversed order. Therefore, figure out what YOUR levers and pedals do to the strings, then compare it to the tablature.
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Beverly Harris


From:
Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, USA
Post Posted 21 Mar 2014 5:30 am     Knee levers Reply with quote

After you learn some of these markings, you may find different ones such as: LKL meaning Left Knee Left, RKR right knee right….
The deal is that some guitars are set up differently than others. Just try yours to see what they do and compare it to the artist's tablature. My LKL raises the 8th and 4th string. My LKR lowers the 8th and 4th string. My RKL has a stop so that I can create a minor chord within the key fret. For example, if I'm in the 8th fret, no pedals, (C major), I can use my RKL stop (1/2 of the way in) to create C minor. That is not the original set up on the guitar.

Some people also name the levers differently D, E, F,… Some pedals are in reversed order. Therefore, figure out what YOUR levers and pedals do to the strings, then compare it to the tablature.
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Richard Sinkler


From:
Oakdale, California
Post Posted 23 Feb 2015 1:27 pm     Reply with quote

Even though we all have different ways of setting up and naming the knee levers, I believe each tab that is shared should include an explanation or tuning chart to let the "student" know what levers and pedals in the tab do what.
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Carl Mesrobian


From:
Salem, Massachusetts, USA
Post Posted 23 Feb 2015 2:14 pm     Reply with quote

My guitars a standard Emmons setup (haha- it IS an Emmons, after all!).

I sometimes half press on A with B down, for the minor, just 'cause I'm too lazy to move my knee, foot and left hand to get the minor on the next fret Smile

The confusing part is looking in the Mel Bay book where the "G" lever (my RKR) is fine for string one, but forget about string 6!

I play guitar, banjo, mandolin, dobro, pedal steel, so I guess a little detail like "where is the lower G natural on pedal steel" won't kill me! I just instinctively grab string 6..
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"Shoot for the moon and if you miss you will still be among the stars." Les Brown
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Jim Morris


From:
Cincinnati Ohio, USA
Post Posted 19 Jul 2017 5:00 pm     Reply with quote

I am prolly as green as anyone in this forum, 3 months at the PSG. Regardless how your guitar is setup, you should just know what lever changes what. Example, if I see lower string 4 or 8, I will use LKR (my E's are on the right knee, standard emmons setup) if I see that I need to lower my 2nd string a half tone, I will use the feel stop on my RKR, or if I need to raise my 7th string or 1st string a half tone (I know 7th string raise isn't used much anymore) I engage RKL. IMHO it's more about knowing your guitar and adapting the tab to what your copedent is.
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